0803-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Aug 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ian Livengood
THEME: Chee Whiz! … today’s themed answers are common phrases, but with a “chee” sound inserted:

24A. German philosopher with an injury? : WOUNDED NIETZSCHE (from “Wounded Knee”)
30A. Guy who’s covered in mud? : FILTHY RITCHIE (from “filthy rich”)
51A. African-American martial art? : BLACK TAI CHI (from “black tie”)
64A. Only form that carbohydrates take? : THE LONE STARCHY STATE (from “the Lone Star State”)
80A. Unsure answer to “Where were the 2014 Winter Olympics held?”? : I GUESS SOCHI (from “I guess so”)
97A. Actor Stanley’s dinner reservation? : TABLE FOR TUCCI (from “table for two”)
107A. Film reviewed by Jughead’s friend? : ARCHIE-RATED MOVIE (from “R-rated movie”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 59s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Little muscle? : PEC
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

10. First, second and third, but not fourth : BASES
When I went to my first Major League Baseball game (it happened to be the one where the San Francisco Giants won the pennant in 1989), I was such a neophyte that I told people my seat was behind fourth base …

15. Rescue squad member, for short : EMT
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

18. Tax law subjects : IRAS
Individual retirement account (IRA)

20. Like much tax law : ARCANE
Something that is “arcane” is something that is understood by only a few, something that might be described as mysterious.

23. Former Potala Palace resident : LAMA
“Lama” is a Tibetan word, meaning “chief” or “high priest”.

The Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet was the residence of the Dalai Lama until he fled the former country in 1959 during the Tibetan Uprising. The building is divided in the White Palace and the Red Palace. The White Palace made up the Dalai Lama’s private living quarters. The larger Red Palace comprised halls, chapels and libraries devoted to religious study.

24. German philosopher with an injury? : WOUNDED NIETZSCHE (from “Wounded Knee”)
Friedrich Nietzsche was a German philosopher. Not my cup of tea …

In 1890, the US 7th cavalry killed over 300 men, women and children of the Lakota tribe, near Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota. The massacre took place when the cavalry entered the Lakota’s camp in an attempt to disarm the group. Apparently a scuffle escalated into indiscriminate shooting. Such was the confusion and lack of control, that the cavalry soldiers supposedly killed and injured many of their own men.

26. Gulf of ___ : ADEN
The Gulf of Aden is the body of water that lies south of the Red Sea, and just north of the Horn of Africa.

27. Court V.I.P.’s : DAS
District Attorneys (DAs)

28. Driver of “Girls” : ADAM
Adam Driver is an actor best known for playing Adam Sackler on the TV show “Girls” that airs on HBO. I hear that Driver is slated to play a bad guy on “Star Wars Episode VII”, which comes out in 2015.

30. Guy who’s covered in mud? : FILTHY RITCHIE (from “filthy rich”)
Guy Ritchie is an English screenwriter and movie director, best known for directing films like “Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels” (1998) and the two “Sherlock Holmes” films. Famously, Ritchie was married to the singer Madonna for several years.

35. “Impossible is nothing” sloganeer : ADIDAS
The brand name Adidas dates back to when Adolf “Adi” Dassler started making his own sports shoes in his mother’s laundry room in Bavaria after returning from WWI. With his brother, Adi founded Dassler shoes. The companies big break came in 1936 at the Berlin Olympics, when Adi persuaded American sprinter Jesse Owens to use his shoes, and with the success of Jesse Owens came success for the fledgling shoe company. After WWII the brothers split, acrimoniously. Adi’s brother, Ru-dolf Da-ssler, formed “Ruda” shoes (later to become Puma), and Adi Das-sler formed “Adidas”.

37. Spiced tea : CHAI
Chai is a drink made from spiced black tea, honey and milk, with “chai” being the Hindi word for “tea”. We often called tea “a cup of char” growing up in Ireland, with “char” being our slang word for tea, derived from “chai”.

41. Motor grp. : AAA
The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

49. Ruckus : STIR
The word “ruckus” is used to mean a commotion, and has been around since the late 1800s. “Ruckus” is possibly a melding of the words “ruction” and “rumpus”.

51. African-American martial art? : BLACK TAI CHI (from “black tie”)
More properly called tai chi chuan, tai chi is a martial art mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

53. Iowa college : COE
Coe College is a private school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa that was founded in 1851. Coe is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church.

57. S O S, e.g. : PLEA
The combination of three dots – three dashes – three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots – pause – three dashes – pause – three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases “Save Our Souls” and “Save Our Ship” are also mnemonics, introduced after the “SOS” signal was adopted.

60. County north of San Francisco : MARIN
When you leave the city of San Francisco via the famous Golden Gate Bridge, you cross into Marin County.

61. Citi Field precursor : SHEA
Shea Stadium in Flushing Meadows, New York was named after William A. Shea, the man credited with bringing National League baseball back to the city in the form of the New York Mets. Shea Stadium was dismantled (not imploded) in 2008-2009, and the site now provides additional parking for the new stadium nearby called Citi Field.

63. ___ valve : AORTIC
The aortic valve is one of the heart’s four valves. It is located between the left ventricle and the aorta, and allows blood to flow out from the left ventricle into the aorta, and not the other way.

64. Only form that carbohydrates take? : THE LONE STARCHY STATE (from “the Lone Star State”)
The single star on the state flag of Texas is a reminder of the “lone star” on the 1836 National Standard of Texas. The single gold star on a blue background symbolized Texas as an independent republic and its struggle for independence from Mexico.

69. “Absalom and Achitophel” poet : DRYDEN
John Dryden was a highly influential poet and playwright in the late 1600s. He came from good literary stock, and was a cousin once-removed of Jonathan Swift.

71. Break ground? : OASIS
The most famous oasis in the US is … Las Vegas, in the middle of the Mojave Desert.

72. Baby 38-Across : JOEYS
“Joey” is the name given to all infant marsupials, not just kangaroos. No one really seems to know for sure what the etymology is of the term “joey”.

75. Record label co-founded by Jay-Z : ROC-A-FELLA
Roc-a-Fella Records was founded in 1996 by three rap artists: Jay-Z, Damon Dash and Kareem “Biggs” Burke … but I really don’t do hrap …

79. “That will be ere the set of ___”: “Macbeth” : SUN
“That will be ere the set of sun” is a line from William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” that is spoken by one of the three witches.

80. Unsure answer to “Where were the 2014 Winter Olympics held?”? : I GUESS SOCHI (from “I guess so”)
Sochi is a city in the west of Russian on the Black Sea coast. It is the largest resort city in the whole country. Sochi is going to be pretty busy in the next few years. It hosted the 2014 Winter Olympic Games, and will host the Russian Formula 1 Grand Prix later in 2014 as well as the 2018 World Cup in soccer.

84. 7-Layer Burrito seller : TACO BELL
Taco Bell was founded by a former US Marine, 25-year-old Glen Bell. His first restaurant was Bell’s Drive-In, located in Southern California. After opening that first establishment, Bell bought up some more restaurants including four named El Taco. He sold off the El Taco restaurants but used the name in part when he opened his first Taco Bell in 1962. Bell sold then sold franchises, with the 100th Taco Bell opening in 1967. The ex-Marine sold off the whole chain to PepsiCo in 1978, and I am guessing he made a pretty penny.

89. GPS course: Abbr. : RTE
A Global Positioning System (GPS) might point out a route (rte.).

91. End of the NATO phonetic alphabet : ZULU
The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie … Zulu.

92. Iroquois foe in the Beaver Wars : ERIE
The Beaver Wars fought in the middle of the 1600s were the result of the Iroquois expanding their territory in the northeastern part of North America. The Iroquois were largely incited to take such steps by their trading partners, the Dutch and English, who profited from the gains in territory. On the losing side of the expansion were the Huron, Neutral, Erie and Susquehannock tribes.

97. Actor Stanley’s dinner reservation? : TABLE FOR TUCCI (from “table for two”)
Stanley Tucci is a favorite actor of mine. Of his many fine performances my favorite is in 2009’s “Julie & Julia” in which he plays the husband of celebrity chef Julia Child. Tucci is quite the cook himself in real life and released “The Tucci Cookbook” in 2012. He is also a co-owner of the Finch Tavern restaurant in Croton Falls, New York.

102. Filmmaker Nicolas : ROEG
Nicolas Roeg is film director from England with quite the pedigree when it comes to association with great movies. He contributed to 1962’s “Lawrence of Arabia”, and he himself directed noted films like “Walkabout” (1972), “Don’t Look Now” (1973) and “The Man Who Fell to Earth” (1976).

107. Film reviewed by Jughead’s friend? : ARCHIE-RATED MOVIE (from “R-rated movie”)
Archie Andrews was the main character in a comic book series introduced in 1941 by Archie Comics. Archie was such a successful character that he went on to appear in a radio series, a syndicated comic strip and two television cartoon shows. Famously, Archie got himself in a love triangle with Betty Cooper, the girl next door, and Veronica Lodge, the only child of the richest man in town.

113. Audubon’s “The Birds of America,” e.g. : TOME
“Tome” first came into English from the Latin “tomus” which means “section of a book”. The original usage in English was for a single volume in a multi-volume work. By the late 16th century “tome” had come to mean “a large book”.

The National Audubon Society is an environmental organization that was formed in 1905. The society is named for John James Audubon, an ornithologist who compiled his famous book “Birds of America” between 1827 and 1838.

115. Parts of a party line : TENETS
A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “he holds”.

117. Dr.’s relatives : STS
Wandering around town, one might walk down a drive (dr.) and a street (st.).

118. “Less Than Zero” author : ELLIS
Bret Easton Ellis wrote a trio of novels that were made into very successful movies: “Less Than Zero” (1987, starring Andrew McCarthy), “American Psycho” (2000, starring Christian Bale) and “The Rules of Attraction” (2002, starring James van der Beek).

120. ___ Fields : MRS
The Mrs. Fields brand of snack foods was founded in the late seventies by Debbi Fields. Fields opened her first store in Palo Alto, California.

Down
1. Rice ___ : PILAF
“Pilaf” is a Persian word, and we use it to describe rice that is browned in oil and then cooked in a seasoned broth.

3. Fine coat material : CAMEL HAIR
Camel hair is a cloth that is actually made of real camel hair, or a blend of camel hair with another fiber.

5. Like Super Bowl crowds : AROAR
Super Bowl I was played in January 1967 between the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs. The Packers emerged victorious in a game with a score of 35-10. That game was officially known as the AFL-NFL Championship Game, as the name “Super Bowl” wasn’t applied until two seasons later. That “first” Super Bowl is now known as Super Bowl III and was played between the New York Jets and the Baltimore Colts. The Jets came out on top.

6. “Pardon me,” in Parma : SCUSI
Parma is a city in northern Italy, famous for its ham (prosciutto) and cheese (parmesan). Although the word prosciutto is used in Italian to mean ham however it is prepared, in English we use the word to describe the dry-cured ham that is served raw, in thin slices. Apparently, prosciutto can be made out of the meat from the leg of a pig, or from the thigh of a wild horse.

9. Wallace of “E.T.” : DEE
The actress Dee Wallace is best known for playing young Elliot’s mother in the Steven Spielberg 1982 masterpiece “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”.

1982’s classic science fiction movie “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” was directed by Steven Spielberg. The idea behind the film came from Spielberg himself, and the character E.T. was based on an imaginary friend that he conjured up as a child after his parents divorced in 1960.

10. Burglary, in police-speak : B AND E
Breaking and entering (B&E)

11. Verdi’s “Ernani! Ernani, involami,” e.g. : ARIA
“Ernani” is an 1844 opera by Giuseppe Verdi that is based on a play called “Hernani” by Victor Hugo. For over a decade, “Ernani” was Verdi’s most popular opera, and then along came “Il trovatore” in 1853.

12. Flute section : STEM
The narrow bowl of a champagne flute is preferred over the wide bowl of a champagne coupe as the smaller surface area of the wine helps retain its carbonation.

15. Rider of the war horse Babieca : EL CID
Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar was known as El Cid Campeador, which translates as “The Champion” or perhaps “The Lord, Master of Military Arts”. El Cid was a soldier who fought under the rule of King Alfonso VI of Spain (among others). However, he was sent into exile by the King in 1080, after acting beyond his authorization in battle. El Cid then offered his services to his former foes, the Moorish kings, After a number of years building a reputation with the Moors, he was recalled from exile by Alfonso. By this time El Cid was very much his own man. Nominally under the orders of Alfonso, he led a combined army of Spanish and Moorish troops and took the city of Valencia on the Mediterranean coast, making it is headquarters and home. He died there, quite peacefully in 1099.

16. Celebrated Bombay-born conductor : MEHTA
Zubin Mehta is an Indian conductor of western classical music, from Mumbai. Mehta studied music in Vienna, where he made his conducting debut in 1958. In 1961 he was named assistant director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, creating a fuss with the music director designate of the orchestra, Georg Solti. Solti resigned as a protest, and Mehta took his job. In 1978 Mehta took over as Music Director and Principal Conductor of the New York Philharmonic, eventually becoming the longest holder of that position.

22. Italian town with Giotto frescoes : ASSISI
The Italian town of Assisi is in Umbria. Assisi is famous as the birthplace of St. Francis and as the home to the Franciscan religious order. It was also the home to Saint Clare and her order of the Poor Sisters (later known as the Poor Clares).

Giotto di Bondone was an artist and painter from Florence usually known simply as “Giotto” who was active in the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance. Giotti’s most famous work is a fresco cycle depicting the life of the Virgin Mary and Christ that was completed in 1305 and that can still be seen in its original location in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua.

25. Roast locale : DAIS
Ultimately our word “dais”, meaning “raised platform for a speaker”, comes from the Latin “discus” meaning a “disk-shaped object”. I guess that many a dais was disc-shaped …

31. Drink since 1948 : HI-C
Hi-C orange drink was created in 1946, and introduced to the market in 1948, initially in the south of the country. The name Hi-C was chosen to emphasize the high vitamin C content in the drink, as it contained added ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

35. Italian wine hub : ASTI
Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy. The region is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine.

40. Hazmat monitor : OSHA
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

Dangerous goods are commonly referred to as hazardous materials, or HazMat. People working with dangerous goods might wear a HazMat suit.

43. Shakespeare character with a magic aphrodisiac : OBERON
Oberon and Titania are the King and Queen of the fairies in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”.

45. ___ asada : CARNE
“Carne Asada” translates from Spanish as “roasted meat”.

46. Whitman’s dooryard flower : LILAC
Walt Whitman wrote his famous poem “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d” as an elegy following the violent death of President Lincoln.

Walt Whitman is considered to be one of the greatest American poets, born in 1819 on Long Island, and living through the American Civil War. Whitman was a controversial character, even during his own lifetime. One view held by him was that the works attributed to William Shakespeare were not actually written by Shakespeare, but rather by someone else, or perhaps a group of people.

47. Loser to Pierce in 1852 : SCOTT
Franklin Pierce was the only US President from the State of New Hampshire. Pierce was by all accounts a tragic figure. Even though he was from the north of the country, he had sympathies for the causes of the South. After he left office, he formally declared support for the Confederacy during the Civil War, which completely destroyed his reputation in the North. Pierce’s marriage fell apart, and he died in 1869 from cirrhosis of the liver after having struggled with alcoholism for much of his life.

Winfield Scott was a general in the US Army and presidential candidate who lost to Franklin Pierce in 1852. Scott was so popular at the time that his Whig Party abandoned the incumbent President Millard Fillmore in favor of Scott as a candidate to replace Fillmore. However, Scott lost to Franklin Pierce. It is thought by many that the contemporary phrase “Great Scott!” is a reference to Winfield Scott.

48. Comic Mandel : HOWIE
Howie Mandel is a Canadian “funny guy”. He’s making a lot of money a few years ago as host of “Deal or No Deal”, and now as a judge on “America’s Got Talent”. But I remember him from “St. Elsewhere” in the eighties, the first American TV show that I started to watch regularly when I moved to the US.

56. Home of Merlin, in Arthurian legend : WALES
Merlin is a figure of legend, most famous as the wizard in the stories of King Arthur.

58. Decorator’s creation : MOTIF
A motif is a recurring element in an artistic work or design.

61. Tuxedo accouterments : STUDS
The style of men’s evening dress called a “tuxedo” was apparently first worn to a country club event in 1886 in New York. The use of a dark dinner jacket without tails became fashionable at the club with the members, and the tradition spread from there. The country club was located in Tuxedo Park, New York, giving the style of dress its name.

“Accouterments” are personal clothing items or accessories. We use the term “accoutrements’ back in Ireland, which sounds more French, but I don’t think is actually a French word. I could be wrong …

62. Chinese dynasty preceding the Three Kingdoms : HAN
The Han Dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China and lasted from 206 BC to 220 AD. It came after the Qin Dynasty, and before the Three Kingdoms.

66. Fast pitch : SPIEL
A spiel is a lengthy speech or argument designed to persuade, like a sales pitch. “Spiel” comes to us from German, either directly (“spiel” is the German for “play”) or via the Yiddish “shpil”.

67. Moonshine : HOOCH
In the Klondike gold rush, a favorite tipple of the miners was “Hoochinoo”, a liquor made by the native Alaskans. Soon after “hooch” (also “hootch”) was adopted as a word for cheap whiskey.

68. Sound investment? : YACHT
A “sound” is a narrow passage of water, especially between an island and the mainland.

69. Workers in booths, maybe : DJS
The world’s first radio disk jockey was one Ray Newby of Stockton, California who made his debut broadcast in 1909, would you believe? When he was 16 years old and a student, Newby started to play his records on a primitive radio located in the Herrold College of Engineering and Wireless in San Jose. The records played back then were mostly recordings of Enrico Caruso.

74. Pack carrier : MULE
A hinny is the offspring of a male horse (the “h-” from h-orse) and a female donkey/ass (the “-nny” from je-nny). A mule is more common, and is the offspring of a female horse and male donkey/ass.

77. One jumping on the bandwagon, say : LATECOMER
“Bandwagon” is an American term, originally used to describe the large wagon that carried the band in a circus procession. Bandwagons then became popular at political rallies, and so one “on the bandwagon” was someone attaching himself or herself to a cause that was likely to succeed. The first use of the term “bandwagon” in this sense is supposedly in writings of Theodore Roosevelt in 1899.

80. Citation abbr. : IBID
Ibid. is short for the Latin word “ibidem” and is typically found in footnotes and bibliographies. Ibid. is used to refer the reader to the prior citation, instead of giving the same information all over again (title, author etc.).

82. Place for a potted plant : SILL
A “sill plate” or simply “sill” is an architectural term for a bottom horizontal member to which vertical members are attached. A “window sill” is specific sill plate that is found at the bottom of a window opening.

86. Boston Garden legend : ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

91. Billy of “Titanic” : ZANE
Billy Zane is an actor from Chicago, Illinois. One of Zane’s most prominent roles was the title character in the 1996 superhero film called “The Phantom”. He also played the somewhat creepy bad guy in the 1989 thriller movie called “Dead Calm”.

When James Cameron made his epic movie “Titanic”, released in 1997, it was the most expensive film ever made, costing about $200 million. It was a good investment for the studio as it became the highest-grossing film of all time, bringing in over $1.8 billion. “Titanic” remained the highest-grossing film until 2010, when Cameron eclipsed the prior record with “Avatar”.

94. Kaffiyeh wearers : ARABS
The “kaffiyeh” is a traditional headdress worn by Arab men and some Kurds. The kaffiyeh is fashioned from a square scarf usually made from cotton. The headdress takes its name from the city of Kufa. Although it has been worn for over a century, the Kaffiyeh gained prominence when it was adopted by Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.

95. Film title character who likes to high-five : BORAT
The full name of the 2006 “mockumentary” is “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan”. Borat is played by a British comedian, Sacha Baron Cohen. Not my cup of tea …

96. Shakers and others : SECTS
“Shakers” is a common name for the religious sect more properly called the United Society of Believer in Christ’s Second Appearing. The sect’s doctrine was based on the teachings of Ann Lee.

98. Police, in slang : FIVE-O
“Five-O” has become urban slang for a police officer, or the police force in general. The term of course is rooted in the 1970s TV Show “Hawaii Five-O”. Hawaii Five-O was a totally fictional police force created for the television show. The name recognizes that Hawaii was the 50th state to join the union. Steve McGarrett in the original show was played by Jack Lord, and “Danno” Williams was played by James MacArthur.

99. Ex-Disney chief Michael : OVITZ
Michael Ovitz was President of the Walt Disney Company from 1995-1997. He didn’t get on well with the company Chairman, Michael Eisner, so he was fired after just over a year. He was sent packing with a nice severance package though: $38m in cash and well over $100m in stock.

100. Witherspoon of “Mud” : REESE
Reese is not actually actress Witherspoon’s given name. She started out life as Laura Jeanne Witherspoon. Reese is her mother’s maiden name.

“Mud” is a 2012 drama film starring Matthew McConaughey and Reese Witherspoon. “Mud” is a coming-of-age film about two boys in the Arkansas delta who come across a fugitive living in the area (“Mud”, played by McConaughy). I haven’t seen this one, but hear that it was very well received by the critics.

101. Agenda makeup : ITEMS
“Agenda”is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

103. Kazakhstan’s ___ Sea : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

The Republic of Kazakhstan in Central Asia is the world’s largest landlocked country. Kazakhstan was the last of the former Soviet Republics to declare itself independent from Russia.

104. Meter site : TAXI
We call cabs “taxis”, a word derived from “taximeter cabs” that were introduced in London in 1907. A taximeter was an automated meter designed to record distance travelled and fare to be charged. The term “taximeter” evolved from “taxameter”, with “taxa” being Latin for “tax, charge”.

108. Basse-Terre, par exemple : ILE
Basse-Terre Island is the western half of Guadalupe in the Lesser Antilles. The other half is known as “Grande-Terre”. The two parts of the island are separated by a narrow sea channel.

109. Unagi, in a sushi bar : EEL
Unagi is the Japanese word for freshwater eel, and unadon is the Japanese word for “eel bowl”. Unadon is actually a contraction of “unagi no kabayaki” (grilled eel) and “donburi” (rice bowl dish).

110. Sot’s woe : DTS
The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called Delirium Tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is “trembling madness”.

Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning a fool. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

111. W.C. sign : MEN
When I was growing up in Ireland, a “bathroom” was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called “the toilet” or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term closet was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes and linens in a “closet”, as a closet was the right size to take the commode. It has been suggested that the British term “loo” comes from Waterloo (water-closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo” in which the pot was called the loo!

112. One half of an iconic 1981 Rolling Stone cover : ONO
The wonderful, wonderful photographer Annie Leibovitz was given the assignment to capture iconic musician John Lennon. During the photoshoot, Lennon insisted that his wife Yoko Ono be included in the shot. The result was the memorable “Rolling Stones” cover in which a naked Lennon is is kissing Yoko Ono while the two lie on the ground. Sadly, very sadly, Lennon was shot and killed just five hours later.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Little muscle? : PEC
4. Like some turkeys : BASTED
10. First, second and third, but not fourth : BASES
15. Rescue squad member, for short : EMT
18. Tax law subjects : IRAS
20. Like much tax law : ARCANE
21. Gallery figure : ART DEALER
23. Former Potala Palace resident : LAMA
24. German philosopher with an injury? : WOUNDED NIETZSCHE (from “Wounded Knee”)
26. Gulf of ___ : ADEN
27. Court V.I.P.’s : DAS
28. Driver of “Girls” : ADAM
29. Models, in a way : SITS
30. Guy who’s covered in mud? : FILTHY RITCHIE (from “filthy rich”)
35. “Impossible is nothing” sloganeer : ADIDAS
37. Spiced tea : CHAI
38. 72-Across, e.g., informally : ROOS
39. Models : POSES
41. Motor grp. : AAA
42. Chase scene staples : COP CARS
46. Request upon leaving? : LAST WISH
49. Ruckus : STIR
51. African-American martial art? : BLACK TAI CHI (from “black tie”)
53. Iowa college : COE
55. Cabby’s phrase on arrival : HERE WE ARE
57. S O S, e.g. : PLEA
58. Some cries for attention : MEOWS
60. County north of San Francisco : MARIN
61. Citi Field precursor : SHEA
63. ___ valve : AORTIC
64. Only form that carbohydrates take? : THE LONE STARCHY STATE (from “the Lone Star State”)
69. “Absalom and Achitophel” poet : DRYDEN
70. Piddling : PUNY
71. Break ground? : OASIS
72. Baby 38-Across : JOEYS
73. In : AMID
75. Record label co-founded by Jay-Z : ROC-A-FELLA
79. “That will be ere the set of ___”: “Macbeth” : SUN
80. Unsure answer to “Where were the 2014 Winter Olympics held?”? : I GUESS SOCHI (from “I guess so”)
83. Group of two : DYAD
84. 7-Layer Burrito seller : TACO BELL
87. How seatbelts should be fastened : TIGHTLY
89. GPS course: Abbr. : RTE
90. Get off one’s chest? : ARISE
91. End of the NATO phonetic alphabet : ZULU
92. Iroquois foe in the Beaver Wars : ERIE
94. Nuts : ABSURD
97. Actor Stanley’s dinner reservation? : TABLE FOR TUCCI (from “table for two”)
102. Filmmaker Nicolas : ROEG
103. Loads : A TON
105. “___ got an idea!” : I’VE
106. Advance : SPOT
107. Film reviewed by Jughead’s friend? : ARCHIE-RATED MOVIE (from “R-rated movie”)
113. Audubon’s “The Birds of America,” e.g. : TOME
114. Arm that’s swung : BATTLE AXE
115. Parts of a party line : TENETS
116. Feel like : SEEM
117. Dr.’s relatives : STS
118. “Less Than Zero” author : ELLIS
119. Alarm clock button : SNOOZE
120. ___ Fields : MRS

Down
1. Rice ___ : PILAF
2. Do away with : ERADICATE
3. Fine coat material : CAMEL HAIR
4. Off-color : BAWDY
5. Like Super Bowl crowds : AROAR
6. “Pardon me,” in Parma : SCUSI
7. Like 3-Down : TAN
8. Target of some passes : END
9. Wallace of “E.T.” : DEE
10. Burglary, in police-speak : B AND E
11. Verdi’s “Ernani! Ernani, involami,” e.g. : ARIA
12. Flute section : STEM
13. D.C. summer setting : EDT
14. Declares, informally : SEZ
15. Rider of the war horse Babieca : EL CID
16. Celebrated Bombay-born conductor : MEHTA
17. It’s a lock : TRESS
19. Seasonal cookie eater : SANTA
22. Italian town with Giotto frescoes : ASSISI
25. Roast locale : DAIS
31. Drink since 1948 : HI-C
32. Trail to follow : TRACE
33. Stop on a wine tour? : CORK
34. Have over : HOST
35. Italian wine hub : ASTI
36. It disappears in the morning : DEW
39. Speed : PACE
40. Hazmat monitor : OSHA
41. Bit of fallout : ASH
43. Shakespeare character with a magic aphrodisiac : OBERON
44. Vanilla : PLAIN
45. ___ asada : CARNE
46. Whitman’s dooryard flower : LILAC
47. Loser to Pierce in 1852 : SCOTT
48. Comic Mandel : HOWIE
50. Holding one’s breath, for hiccups : REMEDY
52. Mimic’s business : APERY
54. Emergency key : ESC
56. Home of Merlin, in Arthurian legend : WALES
58. Decorator’s creation : MOTIF
59. Did away with : ERASED
61. Tuxedo accouterments : STUDS
62. Chinese dynasty preceding the Three Kingdoms : HAN
63. Go at : ASSAIL
64. Game on the line? : TROUT
65. Pack member : HYENA
66. Fast pitch : SPIEL
67. Moonshine : HOOCH
68. Sound investment? : YACHT
69. Workers in booths, maybe : DJS
73. Many moons : AGES
74. Pack carrier : MULE
75. Independent sort : ROGUE
76. Classical work accompanied by a musical instrument : LYRIC POEM
77. One jumping on the bandwagon, say : LATECOMER
78. Suffix with orange : -ADE
80. Citation abbr. : IBID
81. Bump, as one’s toe : STUB
82. Place for a potted plant : SILL
85. Not loose : CAUGHT
86. Boston Garden legend : ORR
88. “Having fun ___?” : YET
91. Billy of “Titanic” : ZANE
93. Displays disuse : RUSTS
94. Kaffiyeh wearers : ARABS
95. Film title character who likes to high-five : BORAT
96. Shakers and others : SECTS
97. Lugs : TOTES
98. Police, in slang : FIVE-O
99. Ex-Disney chief Michael : OVITZ
100. Witherspoon of “Mud” : REESE
101. Agenda makeup : ITEMS
103. Kazakhstan’s ___ Sea : ARAL
104. Meter site : TAXI
108. Basse-Terre, par exemple : ILE
109. Unagi, in a sushi bar : EEL
110. Sot’s woe : DTS
111. W.C. sign : MEN
112. One half of an iconic 1981 Rolling Stone cover : ONO

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3 thoughts on “0803-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Aug 14, Sunday”

  1. Hi there, Suzanne.

    If you look again at the explanation I gave for the theme (under the grid), you'll see that each of the themed answers is a common phrase (such as "black tie" or "filthy rich") and then a "chee" sound is added. In the case of the answer that you cite, "filthy rich" becomes FILTHY RITCHIE with the addition of the "chee" sound. The clue then refers to Guy Ritchie.

    I hope that helps. Thanks for leaving a comment.

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