0525-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 May 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Change of Program … today’s themed answers sound like famous television shows:

23A. Stoners’ memoirs? : DAZE OF OUR LIVES (sounds like “Days of Our Lives”)
28A. Leverage in divorce negotiations? : THE EX FILES (sounds like “The X-Files”)
46A. Dumbstruck duo? : THE AWED COUPLE (sounds like “The Odd Couple”)
62A. Tale of metropolitan religious diversity? : SECTS AND THE CITY (sounds like “Sex and the City”)
85A. Grant Wood portrayal? : AMERICAN IDYLL (sounds like “American Idol”)
99A. Having trouble slowing down? : BRAKING BAD (sounds like “Breaking Bad”)
110A. Cobbler’s heirloom? : AWL IN THE FAMILY (sounds like “All in the Family”)
15D. Double takes? : TWIN PEEKS (sounds like “Twin Peaks”)
76D. Tight spot in South Florida? : MIAMI VISE (sounds like “Miami Vice”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 46s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Rear admiral’s rear : STERN
The rank of rear admiral is usually the lowest of the “admiral” ranks. The term originated with the Royal Navy. In days gone by, an admiral would head up the activities of a naval squadron from the central vessel. He would be assisted by a “vice admiral” who acted from the lead vessel. There would also be a lower-ranking admiral to command the ships at the rear of the squadron, and this was the “rear admiral”.

19. Invader of 1066 : NORMAN
The Norman Conquest of England started in 1066 when William, Duke of Normandy defeated King Harold II of England at the Battle of Hastings. William was crowned King William I of England, and was dubbed William the Conqueror.

23. Stoners’ memoirs? : DAZE OF OUR LIVES (sounds like “Days of Our Lives”)
NBC’s “Days of Our Lives” is the second-longest running soap opera on US television, second only to “General Hospital”. “Days …” has been aired since November 1965.

25. ___ New Guinea : PAPUA
New Guinea is an island in the southwest Pacific Ocean. It is the second largest island in the world (after Greenland). The western half of the the island is ruled by Indonesia, and is made up of the provinces of Papua and West Papua. The eastern half of the island forms the mainland of the independent country called Papua New Guinea.

26. Freud disciple Alfred : ADLER
Alfred Adler was one of the group of medical professionals that founded the psychoanalytic movement. Today Adler is less famous than his colleague, Sigmund Freud.

28. Leverage in divorce negotiations? : THE EX FILES (sounds like “The X-Files”)
“The X-Files” is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history.

33. Home with a view : AERIE
An aerie is the nest of an eagle, and is also known as an “eyrie”.

41. Mallard relative : TEAL
The beautiful color of teal takes it name from the duck called a “teal”, which has dark greenish-blue (teal) markings on its head and wings.

The mallard is the most recognizable of all ducks and is also known as the Wild Duck. The name “mallard” has the same Latin root as our word “male”, probably reflecting how flamboyant the coloring is of the male of the species relative to the female.

46. Dumbstruck duo? : THE AWED COUPLE (sounds like “The Odd Couple”)
“The Odd Couple” is a play by the wonderfully talented Neil Simon first performed on Broadway, in 1965. This great play was adapted for the big screen in 1968, famously starring Jack Lemmon (as Felix Unger) and Walter Matthau (as Oscar Madison). The success of the play and the film gave rise to an excellent television sitcom that ran from 1970-1975, starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman. In 1985, Neil Simon even went so far as to adapt the play for an all-female cast, renaming it “The Female Odd Couple”. I’d like to see that one …

50. Moolah : SHEKELS
The shekel is the currency used today in Israel. The first use of the word “shekel” was in Mesopotamia around 3000 BCE when it probably referred to a specific weight of barley. We now sometimes use “shekels” as a slang term for “money”.

No one seems to know where the term “moolah” meaning “money” comes from, but it has been around since the 1920s.

53. Calculus calculation : SLOPE
The slope or gradient of a straight line is the ratio of the “rise” (delta y) to the “run” (delta x). If there is no difference in the values of y for all points in a line that delta y is zero, and the slope is zero. If the values of y are all the same, then the line is horizontal.

The Latin word “calculus” was originally used for a reckoning or an account, and originally applied to a pebble that was used to maintain a count. The Latin word came from the Greek for a pebble, “khalix”.

57. Balkan capital : SOFIA
Sofia is the capital of Bulgaria. Natives pronounce the name “Sofia” with the emphasis on the “o”, while the rest of us tend to stress the “i”. Bulgarians do agree with us though when it comes to the girl’s name “Sofia”, then they stress the “i” like we do!

59. ___ Beach, Fla. : VERO
Vero Beach, Florida was the home of spring training for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers from 1948 to 2008 (after which the team moved spring training to Arizona).

61. Susan of “L.A. Law” : DEY
The actress Susan Dey first appeared on “The Partridge Family” when she was 17-years-old when she had no acting experience. Years later, Dey won a Golden Globe for playing the leading role of Grace Van Owen in “L. A. Law”.

“L.A. Law” ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network’s most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful “Hill Street Blues” in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, “E.R.” The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

62. Tale of metropolitan religious diversity? : SECTS AND THE CITY (sounds like “Sex and the City”)
Is it just me or would “Sex and the City” be so much better off without the two romantic leads, Carrie and Mr. Big? Carrie Bradshaw is played by Sarah Jessica Parker, and Mr. Big (aka John James Preston) is played by Chris Noth. We never found out Mr Big’s first name (John) until the series finale, and his full name wasn’t revealed until the first movie came out.

75. ’12 or ’13, now : ALUM
An “alumnus” (plural … alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural … alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

77. Western followers? : POSSE
Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

80. Wire service inits. : UPI
Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) was one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a handful of employees.

81. Some lapses : ERRATA
Errata is the past participle of the Latin word “errare” meaning “to err”. We use “errata” to mean a list of errors that have been noted in some publication.

85. Grant Wood portrayal? : AMERICAN IDYLL (sounds like “American Idol”)
An “idyll” (also “idyl”) is a short poem with a pastoral theme, usually depicting the scene in romantic and idealized terms. The word comes from the Greek “eidyllion”, which literally translates to “little picture” but was a word describing a short, poem with a rustic theme.

The iconic Grant Wood work called “American Gothic” was painted in 1930. It depicts a farmer holding a pitchfork standing beside his spinster daughter. Grant used his sister as a model for the daughter, and his dentist as a model for the farmer. You can see “American Gothic” on display at the Art Institute of Chicago.

“American Idol” is a spin-off show that was created after the amazing success of the British television show “Pop Idol”. I can’t abide either program(me) …

88. “The Canterbury Tales” inn : TABARD
The Tabard was an inn located in Southwark in London that was featured in Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales”. The tales in the collection are related as a contest between pilgrims as they travel from the inn to Canterbury Cathedral, with the prize being a free meal at the Tabard when they return. The real-life Tabard was established in 1307 and was destroyed by fire in 1669.

89. Yemeni port : ADEN
Aden is a seaport in Yemen, located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

91. Conciliatory gesture : SOP
Cerberus is a dog with three heads that appears in both Greek and Roman mythology. Cerberus had the job of guarding the gates of Hades and preventing those who had crossed the River Styx from ever escaping. A sop is a piece of food that has been dipped in some liquid, as one might sop a piece of bread in soup. There is an idiomatic expression, “to give a sop to Cerberus”, which means to give someone a bribe, or pay someone off. The idea is that if one could bribe Cerberus, give him a sop to eat, then he would let you pass and escape from Hades.

99. Having trouble slowing down? : BRAKING BAD (sounds like “Breaking Bad”)
I hadn’t seen the AMC drama “Breaking Bad” until recently when my wife borrowed the first and second seasons from our local library. It is a well-written show about a high school teacher stricken by lung cancer who turns to a life of crime to make money. We just have to go find that last season that everyone raves about …

105. Like radon among all gaseous elements : HEAVIEST
Radon is a radioactive gas, a byproduct produced when uranium decays naturally in the earth. Radon gas can collect and accumulate in buildings and rooms that are particularly well insulated with very little air exchange. The danger is very real, as radon is listed as the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoke.

109. “Appointment in Samarra” novelist : O’HARA
“Appointment in Samarra” was John O’Hara’s first novel, published in 1934. Samarra is a city north of Baghdad in Iraq, although the story itself takes place in a fictional town in Pennsylvania. The novel deals with the last three days in the life of Julian English, describing how he destroys himself with a series compulsive acts leading up to his suicide. This one doesn’t qualify as light reading for the plane …

110. Cobbler’s heirloom? : AWL IN THE FAMILY (sounds like “All in the Family”)
“All in the Family” is an American sitcom, a remake of the incredibly successful BBC show called “Till Death Us Do Part”. Both the UK and US versions of the sitcom were groundbreaking in that the storyline brought into focus topics previously considered unsuitable for a television comedy, including racism, homosexuality, women’s liberation, menopause and impotence. “All in the Family” is one of only three TV shows that has topped the Nielsen ratings for five consecutive seasons (the other two are “The Cosby Show” and “American Idol”).

114. Aplomb : POISE
“Aplomb” is such a lovely word, meaning confidence and assurance. It is a French word that literally means “perpendicularity”, or “on the plumb line”. The idea is that someone with aplomb is poised, upright, balanced.

115. “Spamalot” writer and lyricist : ERIC IDLE
Eric Idle was one of the founding members of the Monty Python team. Idle was very much the musician of the bunch, and is an accomplished guitarist. If you’ve seen the Monty Python film “The Life of Brian”, you might remember the closing number, “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life”. It was sung by Idle, and was indeed written by him. That song made it to number 3 in the UK charts in 1991.

“Monty Python and the Holy Grail” was released as a movie in 1975, and was a great success. Some thirty years later the film’s storyline was used as inspiration for the hit musical “Spamalot”. I saw “Spamalot” recently and wasn’t that impressed. But, mine was very much a minority opinion …

118. Clear-cuts, e.g. : DENUDES
Clearcutting is the forestry practice of taking out all the trees in an area, perhaps clearing the way for farming or housing.

Down
2. Jones of jazz : NORAH
The beguiling Norah Jones is the daughter of famous sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar, and is one of my favorite singers. If you haven’t heard Jones sing her song “Come Away with Me”, you just haven’t lived …

4. Saturated : IMBUED
To imbue is to pervade, to soak in. “Imbue” has the same etymological roots as our word “imbibe”.

5. Samsung smartphone : GALAXY
The Galaxy is a series of mobile computing devices made by Samsung that was introduced in 2009.

7. Marshy lowland : SWALE
A swale is a narrow tract of low-lying land that is usually wet or marshy. A swale can be naturally occurring or man-made. One might create a swale to help manage drainage of adjacent land.

9. Legal hearing : OYER
“Oyer” is a term used to describe the reading out loud of a document in court.

11. Star of reality TV’s “The Girls Next Door,” briefly : HEF
Hugh Hefner is from Chicago. His first publishing job was in the military, where he worked as a writer for a US Army newspaper from 1944-46. He went to college after his military service and then worked as a copywriter for “Esquire” magazine. He left “Esquire” to found his own publication that he called “Playboy”, which first hit the newsstands in 1953. “Playboy” has been around ever since.

13. Oscar nominee for “The Wrestler” : ROURKE
“The Wrestler” is a really hard and gritty movie from 2008, a comeback film for actor Mickey Rourke. Rourke stars as an over-the-hill professional wrestler, with Marisa Tomei playing a faded stripper, the love interest. The film received really strong reviews, but I found it to be a tough movie to sit through.

15. Double takes? : TWIN PEEKS (sounds like “Twin Peaks”)
“Twin Peaks” is a TV drama about an FBI murder investigation in the fictional town of Twin Peaks, Washington. I’ve never seen it, but I hear good things …

18. Crime-fighting Eliot : NESS
Eliot Ness was the Treasury agent charged with the task of bringing down the notorious Chicago gangster Al Capone. When Ness took on the job in 1930, Chicago law-enforcement agents were renowned for being corrupt, for being on the take. Ness handpicked 50 prohibition agents who he thought he could rely on, later reducing the group to a cadre of 15 and ultimately just 11 trusted men. That group of 11 earned the nickname “The Untouchables”, the agents who couldn’t be bought.

20. Extra: Abbr. : ADDL
Additional (addl.)

24. Actress ___ Dawn Chong : RAE
The actress Rae Dawn Chong is the daughter of Tommy Chong, of “Cheech and Chong” fame. Rae Dawn appeared in quite a few films in the eighties and nineties, including “The Color Purple” and “Commando”.

30. Poe poem, with “The” : BELLS
Edgar Allan Poe lived a life of many firsts. Poe is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn’t really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious from either drugs or alcohol. Poe died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

31. “The Tempest” spirit : ARIEL
William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” tells the story of Prospero, who was removed from the throne of Milan and banished to a deserted island along with his daughter Miranda. Prospero learns sorcery while cast away, and eventually conjures up a tempest that drives those who usurped his throne onto the island’s shores (in particular his own brother, Antonio). On the island, Prospero is eventually successful in revealing Antonio’s lowly nature.

35. “___ Love,” 1987 LL Cool J hit : I NEED
Rap star LL Cool J was born James Todd Smith. His stage name stands for “Ladies Love Cool James”.

36. Stylist’s goop : GELEE
Gelee is a hair styling product, apparently. I wouldn’t know …

39. 1956 Gregory Peck role : AHAB
“Moby Dick” is a 1956 big screen adaptation of the Herman Melville novel “Moby-Dick”, which was directed by John Huston and stars Gregory Peck in as Captain Ahab. Huston had always envisioned his own father, Walter Huston, playing Ahab. Sadly, Walter passed away by the time John secured funding to for the film. Part of the film was shot in the harbor of Youghal in County Cork, Ireland. There’s a pub In Youghal that was used in some scenes that was renamed “Moby Dick’s” after filming, and I believe you can still get a drink there and see photos of the cast and crew at work.

43. Certain back-scratcher : LOOFA
The loofah (also loofa, lufah and luffa, all Arabic words) is a vine, with fruit that’s very popular in Asia and Africa. If the fruit is allowed to mature, it can be processed to remove everything but the more rigid xylem structure (remember your high school botany class?) leaving a soft, sponge-like mass that is used as a skin polisher.

45. “The Rapture of Canaan” author Reynolds : SHERI
Sheri Reynolds is an author of fiction set in the American South. Her most successful work to date is the novel “The Rapture of Canaan”, which was helped along its way by being selected for Oprah’s Book Club in 1997.

48. Big name in barbecue grills : WEBER
In 1952 George Stephen was working for the Weber Brothers Metal works in Chicago. One of the company’s products was a line of half-spheres that were welded together to make buoys used in Lake Michigan. Stephens took two of these metal hemispheres and converted them into the original kettle grill. The Weber company set up a barbecue division that Stephens ran, and Stephen became so successful that he bought out the Weber Brothers factory and converted all production to the manufacture of grills.

58. Focusing problem, for short : ADD
The “official” name for the condition we sometimes still refer to as “attention deficit disorder” (ADD) is “attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder” (ADHD).

60. Ferrell’s cheerleading partner on “S.N.L.” : OTERI
Cheri Oteri was the SNL cast member who regularly appeared with Will Farrell in the skit featuring a pair of Spartan cheerleaders.

65. Neighbors of Navajos : HOPIS
Many members of the Hopi nation live on a reservation that is actually located within the much larger Navajo reservation in Arizona.

69. Engine booster : TURBO
A turbocharger is a device that is designed to extract more power out of an internal combustion engine. It does so by increasing the pressure of the air entering the intake. The pressure increase comes from the use of a compressor, which is cleverly powered by the engine’s own exhaust gases.

73. Tropicana Field team : RAYS
Tropicana Field is home to the Tampa Bay Rays of Major League Baseball.

74. W.W. II invasion site : ST LO
Saint-Lô is a town in Normandy that was occupied by Germany in 1940. Saint-Lo stood at a strategic crossroads and so there was intense fighting there during the Normandy invasion of 1944. After a prolonged bombardment, very little of the town was left standing.

76. Tight spot in South Florida? : MIAMI VISE (sounds like “Miami Vice”)
“Miami Vice” is a detective television show that first aired in 1984-1989. Stars of the show are Don Johnson and Philip Michael Thomas. There is a 2006 film adaptation of “Miami Vice” that stars Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx.

78. ___ Hawkins Day : SADIE
Sadie Hawkins was a character in Al Capp’s comic strip “Li’l Abner”. Sadie was still a spinster at the age of 35 so declared a “Sadie Hawkins Day” in which she chased the local men in a footrace, with marriage as the prize when one was caught.

81. Taedium vitae : ENNUI
“Ennui” is the French word for boredom, a word that we now use in English. It’s one of the few French words we’ve imported that we haven’t anglicized and actually pronounce “correctly”.

“Taedium vitae” is a lovely Latin term that we use for a feeling that life is boring and dull. The phrase translates literally as “weariness of life”.

82. View from Lake Como : ALP
Lake Como is a glacial lake in Lombardy in Italy. Lake Como has long been a retreat for the rich and famous. Lakeside homes there are owned by Madonna, George Clooney, Gianni Versace, Sylvester Stallone and Richard Branson.

84. Relatives of turtles : PRALINES
“Pralines” and “turtles” are both kinds of chocolate candy, apparently …

86. Neon frame? : ENS
The letter N can be found at either end of “neon”, framing the word.

95. Govt. securities : T-NOTES
A Treasury note (T-Note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-Note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-Bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-Bond matures in 20-30 years.

100. Fancy wheels, familiarly : ROLLS
Henry Royce founded the Rolls-Royce company in 1904 with his partner, Charles Rolls. Royce died at 70 years of age in 1933. His last words were, reportedly, “I wish I had spent more time in the office …”

101. “… so long ___ both shall live?” : AS YE
WILT thou have this Woman to thy wedded wife, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy estate of Matrimony? Wilt thou love her, comfort her, honour, and keep her in sickness and in health; and, forsaking all others, keep thee only unto her, so long as ye both shall live?

102. Part of an old military alphabet : BAKER
There are several phonetic alphabets, including what is called the RAF (Royal Air Force) phonetic alphabet that dates back to before 1956. The RAF phonetic alphabet starts off Able, Baker, Charlie (A, B, C) …

106. “Star Wars” furball : EWOK
The Ewoks are creatures who live on the moon of Endor, first appearing in “Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi”. They’re the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

107. Others, to Ovid : ALII
The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets, Horace and Virgil.

111. End of un film : FIN
In French, one might see the word “fin” (end) at the end of “un film” (a movie).

113. Mme.’s cousin : SRA
The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame) and in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Part of a rainbow : INDIGO
7. Blanket : SMOTHER
14. Rear admiral’s rear : STERN
19. Invader of 1066 : NORMAN
20. Comment upon heading off : AWAY WE GO
21. Catch ___ (surf) : A WAVE
22. Like farmland : ARABLE
23. Stoners’ memoirs? : DAZE OF OUR LIVES (sounds like “Days of Our Lives”)
25. ___ New Guinea : PAPUA
26. Freud disciple Alfred : ADLER
27. Coaches : TRAINERS
28. Leverage in divorce negotiations? : THE EX FILES (sounds like “The X-Files”)
30. Mixologist : BARKEEP
32. Went from black to red, say : DYED
33. Home with a view : AERIE
34. Whinny : NEIGH
38. Sound in a hot tub : AAH!
41. Mallard relative : TEAL
44. Berth : SLIP
45. Theater opening : SCENE I
46. Dumbstruck duo? : THE AWED COUPLE (sounds like “The Odd Couple”)
50. Moolah : SHEKELS
51. Blemished : MARRED
52. Admit (to) : COP
53. Calculus calculation : SLOPE
55. Makes the connection : SEES
56. Zero-star movie : BOMB
57. Balkan capital : SOFIA
59. ___ Beach, Fla. : VERO
61. Susan of “L.A. Law” : DEY
62. Tale of metropolitan religious diversity? : SECTS AND THE CITY (sounds like “Sex and the City”)
67. Word before or after “down” : PAT
70. Yam or turnip : ROOT
71. They’re big in barns : DOORS
72. Huskers’ targets : EARS
75. ’12 or ’13, now : ALUM
77. Western followers? : POSSE
80. Wire service inits. : UPI
81. Some lapses : ERRATA
83. Like many men’s ties : STRIPED
85. Grant Wood portrayal? : AMERICAN IDYLL (sounds like “American Idol”)
88. “The Canterbury Tales” inn : TABARD
89. Yemeni port : ADEN
90. Wrapped (up) : SEWN
91. Conciliatory gesture : SOP
92. Kitchen drawer? : AROMA
93. Some sites for sightseers : RUINS
94. Eke ___ living : OUT A
97. Maltreated : ILL-USED
99. Having trouble slowing down? : BRAKING BAD (sounds like “Breaking Bad”)
105. Like radon among all gaseous elements : HEAVIEST
108. Popped up : AROSE
109. “Appointment in Samarra” novelist : O’HARA
110. Cobbler’s heirloom? : AWL IN THE FAMILY (sounds like “All in the Family”)
113. Bet : STAKED
114. Aplomb : POISE
115. “Spamalot” writer and lyricist : ERIC IDLE
116. Forward : RESEND
117. Heavens : SKIES
118. Clear-cuts, e.g. : DENUDES
119. Off course : ASTRAY

Down
1. Not on point : INAPT
2. Jones of jazz : NORAH
3. Hang (over) : DRAPE
4. Saturated : IMBUED
5. Samsung smartphone : GALAXY
6. With 10-Down, certain punch : ONE
7. Marshy lowland : SWALE
8. Features of many kids’ place mats : MAZES
9. Legal hearing : OYER
10. See 6-Down : TWO
11. Star of reality TV’s “The Girls Next Door,” briefly : HEF
12. Immodest display : EGO TRIP
13. Oscar nominee for “The Wrestler” : ROURKE
14. Highlight : SALIENCE
15. Double takes? : TWIN PEEKS (sounds like “Twin Peaks”)
16. Gutter site : EAVE
17. One with a home away from home : RVER
18. Crime-fighting Eliot : NESS
20. Extra: Abbr. : ADDL
24. Actress ___ Dawn Chong : RAE
26. Mentored, e.g. : AIDED
29. Celebrated : FETED
30. Poe poem, with “The” : BELLS
31. “The Tempest” spirit : ARIEL
33. Hieroglyphic symbol : ASP
35. “___ Love,” 1987 LL Cool J hit : I NEED
36. Stylist’s goop : GELEE
37. ___ fit : HISSY
38. Rest stop convenience, for short : ATM
39. 1956 Gregory Peck role : AHAB
40. “Don’t be a ___!” : HERO
42. Confronts : ACCOSTS
43. Certain back-scratcher : LOOFA
45. “The Rapture of Canaan” author Reynolds : SHERI
47. See 49-Down : ARMS
48. Big name in barbecue grills : WEBER
49. With 47-Down, angry : UP IN
50. Building needs, informally : SPECS
54. Not straight up : OVER ICE
57. Tolerated : STOOD
58. Focusing problem, for short : ADD
60. Ferrell’s cheerleading partner on “S.N.L.” : OTERI
63. Dealt (with) : COPED
64. A musical might be on one : TOUR
65. Neighbors of Navajos : HOPIS
66. Sale site, maybe : YARD
67. Popular pre-marathon meal : PASTA
68. Wedding site : ALTAR
69. Engine booster : TURBO
73. Tropicana Field team : RAYS
74. W.W. II invasion site : ST LO
76. Tight spot in South Florida? : MIAMI VISE (sounds like “Miami Vice”)
78. ___ Hawkins Day : SADIE
79. Correct : EMEND
81. Taedium vitae : ENNUI
82. View from Lake Como : ALP
84. Relatives of turtles : PRALINES
86. Neon frame? : ENS
87. Stirred : AWOKE
89. Spare : AUSTERE
93. In a hurry : RUSHED
95. Govt. securities : T-NOTES
96. Left open-mouthed, say : AGHAST
98. Rent : LET
99. Wedding sight : BRIDE
100. Fancy wheels, familiarly : ROLLS
101. “… so long ___ both shall live?” : AS YE
102. Part of an old military alphabet : BAKER
103. Big band’s booking : ARENA
104. Pops : DADDY
105. Comes to pass, old-style : HAPS
106. “Star Wars” furball : EWOK
107. Others, to Ovid : ALII
108. In : AMID
111. End of un film : FIN
112. Puncture preceder : ACU-
113. Mme.’s cousin : SRA

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2 thoughts on “0525-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 May 14, Sunday”

  1. It's a pleasure to find your blog after enduring Rex Parker's snide, cranky comments on his. Keep up the good work!

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