0504-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 4 May 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Mary Lou Guizzo
THEME: Joined Sides … all of the answers around the EDGE of today’s grid are DOUBLED:

1A. Like many shotguns : (DOUBLE-)BARRELED
9A. Mole : (DOUBLE) AGENT
14A. Back-to-back games : (DOUBLE-)HEADER
127A. Classic London transport : (DOUBLE-)DECKER
128A. Genetic structure : (DOUBLE) HELIX
129A. Source of some discrimination : (DOUBLE) STANDARD
1D. Wind instrument pitched an octave lower than its smaller cousin : (DOUBLE) BASSOON
19D. Hotel accommodation for more than one : (DOUBLE) ROOM
41D. Gang up on, as in basketball : (DOUBLE-)TEAM
53D. Commit a chip-eating faux pas : (DOUBLE-)DIP
74D. Relative of a twin : (DOUBLE) BED
79D. Reaction of surprise : (DOUBLE) TAKE
101D. Betrayed : (DOUBLE)-CROSSED
112D. Attraction in a carbon dioxide molecule : (DOUBLE) BOND

70A. Like some swords … or a hint to this puzzle’s theme : DOUBLE-EDGED

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … ORSINO (Orsito!!), ENNA (Etna)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

20. Singer Christina : AGUILERA
Christina Aguilera is a singer who got her start on television’s “Star Search”. From there she took a role on Disney’s “The Mickey Mouse Club”.

21. ___ gin fizz : RAMOS
By definition, a cocktail known as a Fizz includes lemon or lime juice and carbonated water. The most popular of the genre is the Gin Fizz, made from 3 parts gin, 2 parts lemon juice, 1 part sugar syrup and 5 parts soda water. There is also a variant known as a Ramos gin fizz that was invented by Henry C. Ramos at his bar in New Orleans in 1888. The Ramos gin fizz includes the extra ingredients of egg and orange flower water.

22. “Twelfth Night” lover : ORSINO
The famous quotation about music being the food of love is from William Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night”. The opening lines of the play, spoken by the love-smitten Duke Orsino, are:

If music be the food of love, play on,
Give me excess of it; that surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die.

23. Oil and gasoline giant : SINCLAIR
Sinclair Oil has been around a long time as the company was founded back in 1916 by Harry F. Sinclair. Sinclair Oil sponsored an exhibit at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1933-34 that focused on the Age of the Dinosaurs and the era’s relationship with the formation of petroleum products. The exhibit included a huge model of a brontosaurus that was a big hit with the fair’s attendees. Sinclair cashed in on the popularity of the dinosaur theme by selling rubber dinosaur toys at gas stations and eventually adopted the brontosaurus as part of the company logo.

25. Leonardo ___, a.k.a. Fibonacci : PISANO
Leonardo of Pisa was a famous and respected Italian mathematician, also known as simply “Fibonacci”. He is remembered for writing about a number sequence (although he didn’t “discover” it) that later was given the name “Fibonacci sequence”. He wrote about the series of numbers in his book called “Liber Abaci”, a celebrated work that introduced Arabic numerals (i.e. 0-9) to the Western world.

29. “Platoon” setting : VIETNAM
(34A. “Platoon” director : OLIVER STONE)
Oliver Stone came to prominence as a film director in the 1980s when he came out with a string of war films such as “Salvador”, “Platoon” and “Born on the Fourth of July”. Stone dropped out of Yale University in the sixties and spent six months in South Vietnam teaching English. A few years later he signed up with the US Army and requested combat duty in South Vietnam and completed a 15-month tour. His movie “Platoon” is a semi-autobiographical account of his experiences during the Vietnam War.

30. Sommelier’s prefix : OEN-
In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oen-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

“Sommelier” is the French word for a wine steward.

32. Lozenge brand : LUDEN’S
The Luden’s brand of throat lozenge was created in 1879 by William H. Luden. Luden was able to give his cough drops national attention by giving samples to railroad workers, who took their “freebies” all over the country.

38. “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for ___” (1985 best seller) : A HAT
“The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales” is a book by neurologist Oliver Sacks that was released in 1985. In the book, Sacks describes the case histories of some of his patients. One such history describes a man who suffered from visual agnosia, an inability to correctly recognize some objects. I particular, the man mistook his wife for a hat, hence the title.

42. Old Baby Bell based in the Big Apple : NYNEX
After the breakup of AT&T in 1984, the former AT&T subsidiaries New York Telephone and New England Telephone got together to form NYNEX, a new company providing telephone service in the northeast of the country. The name NYNEX comes from New York (NY) New England (NE) Exchange (X). NYNEX is no more, as it was swallowed up by Verizon.

47. Neuter : GELD
We can use the verb “to geld” to mean “to weaken, deprive of strength”. The term comes from the act of gelding an animal, castration of the male. “Geld” comes from the Old Norse word “gelda” meaning “castrate”.

50. Literary inits. : EAP
Edgar Allan Poe lived a life of many firsts. Poe is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn’t really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious from either drugs or alcohol. Poe died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

52. Jai alai basket : CESTA
A cesta (also “xistera”) is a wicker scoop strapped to the wrist that is used for catching and throwing the ball in jai alai. Jai alai is a game that derives from Basque pelota, and is known as “cesta-punta” in the Basque language.

56. Going out for the afternoon? : SIESTA
We use the word “siesta” to describe a short nap in the early afternoon, taking the word from the Spanish. In turn, the Spanish word is derived from the Latin “hora sexta” meaning “the sixth hour”. The idea is that the nap is taken at “the sixth hour” after dawn.

60. The Who’s “My Generation,” e.g. : DEBUT ALBUM
The English rock band called the Who was formed in 1964, bringing together famed musicians Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend, John Entwistle and Keith Moon. According to “Rolling Stone” magazine, the Who were the third arm of the holy trinity of British rock, alongside the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.

64. Pelvic parts : ILIA
The sacrum and the two ilia are three bones in the human pelvis.

68. Former Obama social secretary Rogers : DESIREE
Desiree Rogers was the White House Social Secretary from 2009 to 2010, working for the Obama administration. After Rogers stepped down, she became Chief Executive Officer of Johnson Publishing Company, the enterprise that publishes “Ebony” and “Jet”.

72. Balkan native : SERB
Serbs are an ethnic group native to the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Although Serbs exist as a minority group in many countries in the region, they are the majority ethnic group in Serbia, in Montenegro and in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

75. Old Jewish villages : SHTETLS
The Yiddish word for “town” is “shtot”, and so “shtetl” is the diminutive form meaning “small town”.

77. Start of a Beatles refrain : OB-LA-DI
“Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” was one of many songs credited to Lennon/McCartney that was actually written by just one of the pair. Paul McCartney wrote this one, a song that John Lennon really did not like at all. Apparently Lennon was quite obstructionist during the recording of the song and even walked out at one point.

78. Old Highlands dagger : SNEE
“Snick or snee” is the name given to cut and thrust while fighting with a knife. The phrase is rooted in a pair of Dutch words and it gave its name to a “snee”, a light sword-like knife.

79. Thelma and Louise, e.g. : TITLE ROLES
“Thelma and Louise” is a much-respected 1991 movie starring Geena Davis as Thelma and Susan Sarandon as Louise. Brad Pitt has a supporting role, and indeed “Thelma and Louise” was the film that gave Pitt his big break.

82. Davis and Midler : BETTES
I must confess that I have a problem watching movies starring Bette Davis. I think I must have seen her play one of her more sinister roles when I was a kid and it gave me nightmares or something. So, I have never seen the 1950 classic “All About Eve”, given that Bette Davis gets top billing. But, the title role of Eve Harrington was played by Anne Baxter, and Ms Baxter’s movies I do enjoy. Coincidentally, on the epic television series “Hotel”, when Bette Davis became ill, it was Anne Baxter who was chosen to take on her role.

One of my favorite singers, and indeed all-round entertainers, is Bette Midler. If you’ve ever seen her live show you’ll know that “camp” is a good word to describe it, as her humor is definitely “out there” and quite bawdy. Early in her career, Midler spent years singing in the Continental Baths, a gay bathhouse in New York City. There she became very close friends with her piano accompanist, Barry Manilow. While singing in the bathhouse, Bette only wore a white towel, just like the members of her audience. It was in those days that she created her famous character “the Divine Miss M” and also earned herself the nickname “Bathhouse Betty”.

98. Landmark tech product of 1981 : IBM PC
The original IBM Personal Computer is model number 5150, which was introduced to the world on August 12, 1981. The term “personal computer” was already in use, but the success of the IBM 5150 led to the term “PC” being used for all computer products compatible with the IBM platform.

102. Latin “to be” : ESSE
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

103. Biblical name of ancient Syria : ARAM
The ancient Biblical land of Aram was named after Aram, a grandson of Noah. Aram was located in the center of modern-day Syria.

112. Kind of algebra : BOOLEAN
In elementary algebra, the variable used can be any number. In Boolean algebra, the variables can only have the values of 1 or 0 i.e. true or false.

116. “Is it in you?” sloganeer : GATORADE
Gatorade was developed at the University of Florida by a team of researchers at the request of the school’s football team. And so, Gatorade is named after the Gators football team.

118. Write-___ : INS
A write-in candidate in an election is one for whom one can vote, but one whose name does not appear on the official ballot. Electors have to take the extra step of writing the candidate’s name on the ballot, an added step that makes it really hard for the candidate to emerge victorious. In a 1967 local election in Ecuador, a company ran a marketing campaign for a foot powder called Pulvapies, using the catchphrase “For Mayor: Honorable Pulvapies”. Some electors wrote in the name Pulvapies on their ballots, and the foot powder won …

120. Lhasa ___ (dogs) : APSOS
The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after Lhasa (the capital city) and apso (a Tibetan word meaning “bearded”). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

121. Some sheet fabrics : PERCALES
Percale is a cotton fabric that is often used make bedsheets.

124. Nothing, in Napoli : NIENTE
Naples (“Napoli” in Italian) is the third largest city in Italy. The name “Napoli” comes from the city’s Ancient Greek name, which translates as “New City”. That’s a bit of a paradox as today Naples is one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world.

125. Tuscany town : SIENA
Siena is a beautiful city in the Tuscany region of Italy. In the center of Siena is the magnificent medieval square called Piazza del Campo, a paved sloping open area made up of nine triangular sections. The square has to be seen to be believed. Twice a year, the famous bareback horse-race called the Palio di Siena is held in the Piazza.

127. Classic London transport : (DOUBLE-)DECKER
The red double-decker bus has become a national symbol of England, and is particularly associated with the London transport system. I am proud to say that my godfather was a London bus driver for many years.

128. Genetic structure : (DOUBLE) HELIX
Francis Crick and James Watson discovered that DNA had a double-helix, chain-like structure, and published their results in Cambridge in 1953. To this day the discovery is mired in controversy, as some crucial results collected by fellow researcher Rosalind Franklin were used without her permission or even knowledge.

Down
4. Rock’s Ocasek : RIC
Ric Ocasek is an American musician of Czech heritage, and was the lead vocalist of the rock band known as the Cars.

7. Heath evergreens : ERICAS
It is a commonly held belief that heather and erica are the same thing botanically, but in fact, erica is another name for a different species called “heath”.

9. Huffington of the Huffington Post : ARIANNA
“The Huffington Post” is a news website founded in 2005 by Arianna Huffington. It is a very active site, with 3,000 people contributing blog posts (including many celebrities and politicians), and readers leaving over one million comments every month. “The Huffington Post” was sold to AOL in 2011 for $315 million, with Arianna Huffington staying on as editor-in-chief.

10. Teri of “Tootsie” : GARR
The lovely Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

13. Lao-___ : TSE
Lao Tse (also Lao-Tzu) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism.

15. Native New Yorkers : ERIES
The Erie people lived on lands south of Lake Erie. The Erie were sometimes referred to as the Cat Nation, a reference to the mountain lions that were ever-present in the area that they lived. The name “Erie” is a shortened form of “Erielhonan” meaning “long tail”, possibly a further reference to the mountain lion or cat, which was possibly used as a totem. The Erie people gave their name to the Great Lake.

17. Primatologist Fossey : DIAN
Dian Fossey carried out her famous study of gorilla populations in the mountain forests of Rwanda (NB: it was Jane Goodall that worked with chimpanzees). Sadly, Fossey was found dead in her cabin in Rwanda in 1986, murdered in her bedroom, her skull split open by a machete. The crime was never solved.

18. Sicilian city : ENNA
The city of Enna sits very high up in the hills of Sicily, overlooking the whole island below. Enna is the capital of the province that bears its name, which is the highest province in the whole of Italy.

28. Kindle competitor : NOOK
The Barnes & Noble electronic-book reader is called the Nook. The Nook accounts for 10-15% of electronic book readers in the world.

I bought myself a Kindle Fire HD a few months ago. I’ve started reading e-books for the first time in my life, as well as enjoying other computing options available with the tablet device. I love it …

35. Chillax : VEG
“Chillax” is a slang term meaning “chill and relax”. Who’da thunk it …?

40. Aleutian isle : ATTU
Attu is the westernmost island in the Aleutian chain, and so is the westernmost part of Alaska. Japanese forces took the island in October 1942, eventually landing as many as 2,900 soldiers there. In May 1943, the US Army retook the island in twenty days of fighting that is now called the Battle of Attu, the only land battle to take place on US soil during WWII. I am very proud of my father-in-law, who served in the Aleutians in WWII …

46. Tar Heels’ state: Abbr. : N CAR
Tar Heel is a nickname for anyone living in, or from, the state of North Carolina. As such, it is the nickname also of the athletic teams of the University of North Carolina. No one seems to know for sure where the term “Tar Heel” originated, but it is thought to be related to the historical importance of the tar, pitch and turpentine industries that thrived in the state due to the presence of vast forests of pine trees.

48. German musical entertainment : LIEDER
“Lied” (plural “Lieder”) is a German word meaning “song”. The term is often used to describe romantic German poems that have been set to music. The most famous Lieder are perhaps those written by Franz Schubert, example being the lovely “”Der Tod und das Mädchen” and “Gretchen am Spinnrade”.

49. Auto sponsor of Groucho Marx’s “You Bet Your Life” : DESOTO
The DeSoto brand of car was built by Chrysler from 1928 to 1961. The line was named after the Spanish explorer and conquistador, Hernando de Soto, widely reported as the first European to have crossed the Mississippi River (although Cabeza de Vaca had at least discovered one of the mouths of the Mississippi twenty years earlier).

Groucho Marx’s real name was Julius Henry Marx. By the time Groucho started his successful, post-Hollywood career hosting the quiz show “You Bet Your Life”, he was sporting a real mustache. For all his movies, his mustache had been painted on with greasepaint.

53. Commit a chip-eating faux pas : (DOUBLE-)DIP
The term “faux pas” is French in origin, and translates literally as “false step” (or “false steps”, as the plural has the same spelling in French).

54. King lead-in : A LA
A dish prepared “a la king” (usually chicken or turkey), is food prepared in a cream sauce, with mushrooms, pimentos, green peppers and sherry.

57. Shell seen around water : SCULL
A scull is a boat used for competitive rowing. The main hull of the boat is often referred to as a shell. Crew members who row the boat can be referred to as “oars”.

58. Formatting feature on a typewriter : TAB SET
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious as it involved lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key, which could be depressed causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

67. Job listing inits. : EEO
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) is a term that has been around since 1964 when the Equal Employment Commission was set up by the Civil Rights Act.

73. Old car make that’s a homophone of a modern car model : REO
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom E. Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

Kia have making the subcompact model called a Rio since 2000.

76. Anatomical tissue : TELA
In the world of anatomy, telae are pieces of delicate or weblike tissue.

83. Brand of power tools : STIHL
Stihl is a manufacturer of power tools mainly used in landscaping and forestry. The company headquarters is located not far from Stuttgart in Germany. Stihl was founded in 1926 by Andreas Stihl, and first manufactured chainsaws.

89. Queen’s honour: Abbr. : OBE
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry in the UK that was established in 1917 by King George V. There are five classes within the order, which are in descending seniority:

– Knight Grand Cross (GBE)
– Knight Commander (KBE)
– Commander (CBE)
– Officer (OBE)
– Member (MBE)

91. Brightly colored bird : TANAGER
The Scarlet Tanager is a beautiful-looking bird, truly scarlet in color other than its wings and tail. It is in the cardinal family.

92. Country whose flag says “God is great” 22 times : IRAN
The Iranian flag in use today was adopted in 1980, a product of the Iranian Revolution. The flag is a tricolor composed of horizontal bands of green, white and red. Included in the green and red bands are the repeated words “Allahu Akbar”, which translates as “God is great”.

93. Chess champ Mikhail : TAL
Mikhail Tal was truly a chess legend. Tal holds the record for the longest unbeaten streak in competition chess. And the second longest winning streak, well, that was by Tal as well.

97. Mexican shawls : SARAPES
“Serape” (also “sarape”) is the English pronunciation and spelling of the Spanish word “zarape”. A zarape is like a Mexican poncho, a soft woolen blanket with a hole in the middle for the head. Most serapes have colorful designs that use traditional Mayan motifs.

99. ___ Gorilla, 1960s TV cartoon character : MAGILLA
“The Magilla Gorilla Show” is a Hanna-Barbera cartoon production that originally aired from 1964 to 1967.

104. Raucous bird : MAGPIE
The bird known as a “jay” is sometimes called a “magpie”, although the terms are not completely interchangeable.

107. South American land : TIERRA
“Tierra” is Spanish for “earth, land”.

108. Al ___ : DENTE
The Italian expression “al dente” literally means “to the tooth” or “to the bite” and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender yet still crisp.

109. Swiss city on the Rhine : BASEL
The city of Basel in Switzerland lies right where the Swiss, French and German borders meet, and so has suburbs that lie in both France and Germany.

114. Equivalent of 20 fins : ONE C
The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

117. Collette of “United States of Tara” : TONI
“United States of Tara” is a comedy-drama that aired for a couple of years on Showtime. Star of the show is the talented Australian actress Toni Collette. The character she plays is Tara, a woman suffering from multiple personality disorder.

122. Bamboozle : CON
It’s thought that the lovely word “bamboozle” came into English from the Scottish “bombaze” meaning “perplex”. We’ve been using “bamboozle” since the very early 1700s.

123. City council rep. : ALD
The term “alderman” comes from English law, and is used for a member of a municipal assembly or council. In some locations in the US some cities have a Board of Aldermen instead of a city council.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Like many shotguns : (DOUBLE-)BARRELED
9. Mole : (DOUBLE) AGENT
14. Back-to-back games : (DOUBLE-)HEADER
20. Singer Christina : AGUILERA
21. ___ gin fizz : RAMOS
22. “Twelfth Night” lover : ORSINO
23. Oil and gasoline giant : SINCLAIR
24. Very vexed : IRATE
25. Leonardo ___, a.k.a. Fibonacci : PISANO
26. ___-pitch softball : SLO
27. What a detective tries to reconstruct : SCENARIO
29. “Platoon” setting : VIETNAM
30. Sommelier’s prefix : OEN-
31. Flavor : SEASON
32. Lozenge brand : LUDEN’S
34. “Platoon” director : OLIVER STONE
37. Suckling site : TEAT
38. “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for ___” (1985 best seller) : A HAT
42. Old Baby Bell based in the Big Apple : NYNEX
43. Assents : OKAYS
45. Stretch out : ELONGATE
47. Neuter : GELD
50. Literary inits. : EAP
52. Jai alai basket : CESTA
53. Water checker? : DAM
56. Going out for the afternoon? : SIESTA
60. The Who’s “My Generation,” e.g. : DEBUT ALBUM
64. Pelvic parts : ILIA
66. Musician’s practice with four sharps : E SCALE
68. Former Obama social secretary Rogers : DESIREE
69. Over : PAST
70. Like some swords … or a hint to this puzzle’s theme : DOUBLE-EDGED
72. Balkan native : SERB
75. Old Jewish villages : SHTETLS
77. Start of a Beatles refrain : OB-LA-DI
78. Old Highlands dagger : SNEE
79. Thelma and Louise, e.g. : TITLE ROLES
82. Davis and Midler : BETTES
84. Cover some ground? : SOD
85. Dizzy : AREEL
86. Bit : TAD
88. “___ put it another way …” : OR TO
90. Persevered : KEPT AT IT
94. Spurs : GOADS
98. Landmark tech product of 1981 : IBM PC
102. Latin “to be” : ESSE
103. Biblical name of ancient Syria : ARAM
105. Dispel differences : CLEAR THE AIR
108. “CSI” setting : DNA LAB
110. Coal or pine product : TAR OIL
111. Melted chocolate, e.g. : GOO
112. Kind of algebra : BOOLEAN
116. “Is it in you?” sloganeer : GATORADE
118. Write-___ : INS
119. Renter’s dream, maybe : OWNING
120. Lhasa ___ (dogs) : APSOS
121. Some sheet fabrics : PERCALES
124. Nothing, in Napoli : NIENTE
125. Tuscany town : SIENA
126. Sign-up : ENROLLEE
127. Classic London transport : (DOUBLE-)DECKER
128. Genetic structure : (DOUBLE) HELIX
129. Source of some discrimination : (DOUBLE) STANDARD

Down
1. Wind instrument pitched an octave lower than its smaller cousin : (DOUBLE) BASSOON
2. How ballerinas move : AGILELY
3. “Enter quickly!” : RUN ON IN!
4. Rock’s Ocasek : RIC
5. Pipe fitting : ELL
6. Renter : LEASER
7. Heath evergreens : ERICAS
8. Thinks maybe one can : DARES TO
9. Huffington of the Huffington Post : ARIANNA
10. Teri of “Tootsie” : GARR
11. Subject of some computer settings : EMAIL
12. Closeted : NOT OUT
13. Lao-___ : TSE
14. Enter quickly : HOP INTO
15. Native New Yorkers : ERIES
16. ___ D.A. : ASST
17. Primatologist Fossey : DIAN
18. Sicilian city : ENNA
19. Hotel accommodation for more than one : (DOUBLE) ROOM
28. Kindle competitor : NOOK
29. ___ chops : VEAL
31. Battle of the ___ : SEXES
33. Letter that’s also a name : DEE
35. Chillax : VEG
36. Art appreciation : EYE
38. Forever young : AGELESS
39. Dimmed stars? : HAS-BEENS
40. Aleutian isle : ATTU
41. Gang up on, as in basketball : (DOUBLE-)TEAM
44. “How ___” : SAD
46. Tar Heels’ state: Abbr. : N CAR
48. German musical entertainment : LIEDER
49. Auto sponsor of Groucho Marx’s “You Bet Your Life” : DESOTO
51. Hawk : PEDDLE
53. Commit a chip-eating faux pas : (DOUBLE-)DIP
54. King lead-in : A LA
55. Boo-boos : MISSTEPS
57. Shell seen around water : SCULL
58. Formatting feature on a typewriter : TAB SET
59. Totality : ALL
61. Sired : BEGAT
62. Unfazed by : USED TO
63. Better at picking things up? : TIDIER
65. Jock : ATHLETE
67. Job listing inits. : EEO
71. Descent : EBB
73. Old car make that’s a homophone of a modern car model : REO
74. Relative of a twin : (DOUBLE) BED
76. Anatomical tissue : TELA
79. Reaction of surprise : (DOUBLE) TAKE
80. Ticks off : IRES
81. Need a lift? : SAG
83. Brand of power tools : STIHL
87. Vet, e.g. : DOC
89. Queen’s honour: Abbr. : OBE
91. Brightly colored bird : TANAGER
92. Country whose flag says “God is great” 22 times : IRAN
93. Chess champ Mikhail : TAL
95. Part of a jazz combo : ALTO SAX
96. Precious : DEAR
97. Mexican shawls : SARAPES
99. ___ Gorilla, 1960s TV cartoon character : MAGILLA
100. First of a kind : PIONEER
101. Betrayed : (DOUBLE)-CROSSED
104. Raucous bird : MAGPIE
106. Squirrel, e.g. : RODENT
107. South American land : TIERRA
108. Al ___ : DENTE
109. Swiss city on the Rhine : BASEL
112. Attraction in a carbon dioxide molecule : (DOUBLE) BOND
113. Baby’s boo-boo : OWIE
114. Equivalent of 20 fins : ONE C
115. Something clickable : LINK
117. Collette of “United States of Tara” : TONI
120. Blond shade : ASH
122. Bamboozle : CON
123. City council rep. : ALD

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