0318-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 18 Mar 14, Tuesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Kwong
THEME: A Farewell to Arms … all of today’s themed answers are well-known phrases with the letters ARM removed:

17A. Home-invading Gore? : BURGLAR AL (from “burglar alarm”)
24A. Area for aristocrats? : GENT DISTRICT (from “garment district”)
52A. Exchange of vows again for the Grim Reaper? : DEATH WED OVER (from “death warmed over”)
64A. Emmy, Oscar and Grammy-winning reptile? : SNAKE CHER (from “snake charmer”)

38A. W.W. I novel … hinted at by 17-, 24-, 52- and 64-Across : A FAREWELL TO ARMS

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 07s!! (maybe because I’m solving this on St. Paddy’s Day evening!)
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Outfielder Ty : COBB
Ty Cobb was one of the richest baseball players of all times. When he retired, Cobb was a major stockholder of the Coca-Cola Corporation. By the time he passed away in 1961, Cobb had an even bigger investment in General Electric. He left an estate after his death worth about $86m (in 2008 dollars).

13. Amman’s Queen ___ International Airport : ALIA
Before Alia al-Hussein married King Hussein of Jordan, she worked for Royal Jordanian Airlines. Sadly, Queen Alia was killed in a helicopter crash in 1977. Now the airport in the capital of Amman is named in her honor: Queen Alia International Airport.

15. Law office worker, for short : PARA
A paralegal is someone who is trained in legal matters sufficiently to assist a lawyer. A paralegal cannot engage in the practice of law and must be supervised by a qualified lawyer.

17. Home-invading Gore? : BURGLAR AL (from “burglar alarm”)
Al Gore was born in Washington DC, the son of Al Gore, Sr., then a US Representative for the state of Tennessee. After deferring his military service in order to attend Harvard, the younger Gore became eligible for the draft on graduation. Many of his classmates found ways of avoiding the draft, but Gore decided to serve and even took the “tougher” option of joining the army as an enlisted man. Actor Tommy Lee Jones shared a house with Gore in college and says that his buddy told him that even if he could find a way around the draft, someone with less options than him would have to go in his place and that was just wrong.

21. Señor chaser? : -ITA
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

23. Elevator pioneer Elisha : OTIS
Elevators (simple hoists) have been around for a long time. What Elisha Otis did was come up with the “safety elevator”, a design that he showcased at the 1853 World’s Fair in New York. At the Fair, Otis would stand on an elevated platform in front of onlookers and order his assistant to cut the single rope holding up the platform. His safety system kicked in when the platform had only fallen a few inches, amazing the crowd. After this demonstration, the orders came rolling in.

30. Bush’s labor secretary : CHAO
When President George W. Bush appointed Elaine Chao as Secretary of Labor, he made a bit of history as Chao then became the first Chinese American in history to hold a cabinet post. It turned out that Chao became the only cabinet member to hold her post for President Bush’s full eight years in office. In 1993, Chao married Mitch McConnell, the Republican Leader of the US Senate.

32. Retrovirus material : RNA
The genes of most viruses are encoded in DNA. Retroviruses are different in that their genes are encoded in RNA, and so are sometimes called “RNA viruses”. The best-known retrovirus is HIV.

38. W.W. I novel … hinted at by 17-, 24-, 52- and 64-Across : A FAREWELL TO ARMS
“A Farewell to Arms” is a somewhat autobiographical novel written by Ernest Hemingway, telling the story of an American ambulance driver serving with the Italian army during WWI. The most famous screen adaptation is probably the 1957 version starring Rock Hudson and Jennifer Jones.

43. Liszt’s “Consolation No. 3” is in it : D-FLAT
The “Consolations” are a set of six solo works for piano that were composed by Franz Liszt. The consolations are often described as “nocturne-like”.

Franz Liszt was a Hungarian composer and a fabulous pianist. Particularly towards the end of his life, Liszt gained a tremendous reputation as a teacher. While he was in his sixties, his teaching jobs caused him to commute regularly between the cities of Rome, Weimar and Budapest. It is quite remarkable that a man of such advanced age, and in the 1870s, could do so much annual travel. It is estimated that Liszt journeyed at least 4,000 miles every year!

46. Leading inits. in frozen desserts : TCBY
TCBY is a chain of stores selling frozen yogurt, founded in 1981 in Little Rock, Arkansas. The acronym TCBY originally stood for “This Can’t Be Yogurt”, but this had to be changed due to a lawsuit being pressed by a competitor called “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt”. These days TCBY stands for “The Country’s Best Yogurt”.

49. Visual gag character of British TV : MR BEAN
Mr. Bean is a famous comedic character created and performed by the marvelous English comedian Rowan Atkinson.

56. Railroad chartered in 1832 : ERIE
The Erie Railroad operated from 1832 to 1960, and connected New York City with Lake Erie. The Erie Railroad was largely built as compensation for the towns in the Southern Tier of New York who lost business when the Erie Canal was completed in 1825.

57. Old Testament prophecy book: Abbr. : ISA
The Book of Isaiah is part of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. Isaiah is not mentioned in the Qur’an, but many Muslim scholars consider Isaiah a prophet.

58. “X-Men” character with blue fur : BEAST
Beast is a founding member of the Marvel Comics team of mutants known as the “X-Men”. Beast is a big brute, strong with oversized hands and feet. He is also an expert in biochemistry and genetics as serves as the medical doctor for the X-Men team.

64. Emmy, Oscar and Grammy-winning reptile? : SNAKE CHER (from “snake charmer”)
Cher’s real name is Cherilyn Sarkisian, born in 1946. In her acting career, Cher was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar of 1984 for her performance in “Silkwood”. She went further in 1998 and won the Best Actress Oscar for playing Loretta Castorini in “Moonstruck”.

69. Oscar nominee Garr : TERI
The lovely Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

70. Neighbor of Minneapolis : EDINA
Edina, Minnesota lies just southwest of Minneapolis. The town takes its name from Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland. It was suggested by a Scottish mill owner at the time a new village was being set up in 1888.

Down
1. Yeast cake made with rum : BABA
Rum baba (also “baba au rhum” in French) is a small yeast cake saturated in rum, and sometimes filled with whipped cream. Rum baba is derived from the recipe for the tall “babka” yeast cake that was introduced to the world by the Polish communities. The Polish words “baba” and “babka” mean “old woman” or “grandmother” in English. I guess someone must have thought that all grandmothers were saturated in rum!

2. Eisenhower vis-à-vis West Point, informally : ALUM
An “alumnus” (plural … alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural … alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn’t start until 1802.

4. E-file preparer : CPA
Certified public accountant (CPA)

7. Like Latvia or Lithuania : BALTIC
The Baltic is a sea in northern Europe that is much less saline than the oceans. The lower amount of salt in the Baltic partially explains why almost half of the sea freezes during the winter. In fact, the Baltic has been known to completely freeze over several times over the past few centuries.

Latvia is one of the former Soviet Socialist Republics. People from Latvia are called Letts.

The nation of Lithuania is a former Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) sitting on the Baltic Sea in Northern Europe.

9. Razr maker : MOTOROLA
RAZR is a line of flip phones introduced by Motorola in 2004.

10. One instrumental in history? : AMATI
The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, they were succeeded by Girolamo’s son, Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

12. Secret meeting : TRYST
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

14. To the max, ’60s-style : A GOGO
The term “à gogo” is French in origin, in which language it means “in abundance”.

18. Editor Marshall of financial publications : LOEB
Marshall Loeb is an author and editor who writes about the business world. Loeb was managing editor for “Money” magazine from 1980 to 1986, and managing editor for “Fortune” magazine from 1986 to 1994.

25. Oslo’s home: Abbr. : NORW
Oslo is an ancient city, founded around 1048. The medieval city was destroyed by fire in 1624 and was rebuilt by the Danish-Norwegian King Christian IV and renamed Christiania. In 1877 there was an official change of the name’s spelling to “Kristiania”, and then more recently in 1925 the name was restored to the original Oslo. Things have gone full circle as the center of Oslo, the area that would have been contained by the original medieval walls, has recently been named Christiania again.

29. Translucent gem : OPAL
97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, about 80%.

33. Edmonton’s province: Abbr. : ALB
Alberta is a big province, about the size of Texas. Alberta is named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Princess Louise also donated her name to Lake Louise, the large glacial lake in the province, now withing the bounds of Banff National Park.

35. Whale of a movie? : ORCA
The killer whale, or “orca”, features in several movies, perhaps most notably “Free Willy”.

36. Agent under Hoover, informally : G-MAN
The nickname “G-men” is short for “Government Men” and refers to agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

J. Edgar Hoover was the controversial director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) from the time of its founding in 1935 until his death in 1972. While being given the credit for establishing the FBI as a first-class crime-fighting organization, he was also criticized by many for exceeding his authority. In particular, he came into conflict with Presidents Truman and Kennedy, both of whom considered dismissing him. Neither took that step however, fearing the political fallout.

37. Yemen-to-Zimbabwe dir. : SSW
Yemen is located on the Arabian Peninsula, lying just south of Saudi Arabia and west of Oman. Yemen is the only state on the peninsula that is a republic (its official name is the Republic of Yemen). Everyone over the age of 18 gets to vote, but only Muslims can hold elected office.

The country now known as Zimbabwe started out as a British colony called Southern Rhodesia, named after Cecil Rhodes the British empire builder.

41. Exec’s car, maybe : LIMO
The word “limousine” actually derives from the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a “limousine”. Well, that’s how the story goes anyway …

42. Star of “Fringe,” Anna ___ : TORV
Anna Torv is an actress from Australia who is best known for playing agent Olivia Dunham of the FBI on the TV show “Fringe”.

“Fringe” is a sci-fi TV show that originally aired from 2008 to 2013. The show is about a team of FBI agents (in the Fringe Division) that use “fringe science” to solve mysterious occurrences related to a parallel universe.

47. Home of the Bahamas, once: Abbr. : BWI
The former British West Indies (BWI) was made up of eight colonies: the Bahamas, Barbados, British Guiana, British Honduras, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, the Windward Islands and the Leeward Islands.

The Bahamas is a group of islands in the Atlantic Ocean, lying in the same island chain as Cuba and Hispaniola. The Bahamas was a British colony for many years but became independent in 1973, although it retains membership in the British Commonwealth.

50. Early film star Daniels : BEBE
Bebe Daniels was a singer, dancer and a prolific actress. Starting in the silent movie era, Daniels made over 230 films.

52. Caterpillar rival : DEERE
John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere’s invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of “stickiness”.

54. Need for some fish dishes : AIOLI
To the purist, especially in Provence in the South of France, the “home” of aioli, aioli is prepared just by grinding garlic with olive oil. However, other ingredients are often added to the mix, particularly egg yolks.

55. Beatrice’s adorer : DANTE
Beatrice Portinari was a woman from Florence who was known as the poet Dante’s muse. Dante featured two characters called Beatrice in his works (in “Divine Comedy” and “Paradiso”), and it is speculated that both were inspired by Portinati.

60. Lab fluids : SERA
Blood serum is the clear, yellowish part of blood i.e. that part which is neither a blood cell or a clotting factor. Included in blood serum are antibodies, the proteins that are central to our immune system. Blood serum from animals that have immunity to some disease can be transferred to another individual, hence providing that second individual with some level of immunity. Blood serum used to pass on immunity can be called “antiserum”.

63. Finnish hockey star Tikkanen : ESA
Esa Tikkanen is a retired hockey player from Finland. He was on the winning team in five Stanley Cup finals, between 1985 to 1994.

66. ___-Tiki : KON
The Kon-Tiki was a raft used by Thor Heyerdahl in 1947 to cross the Pacific Ocean from South America to the Polynesian islands. The original raft used in the voyage is on display in the Kon-Tiki Museum in Oslo, Norway (Heyerdahl was a native of Norway).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Corrupt : BAD
4. Outfielder Ty : COBB
8. Brainy : SMART
13. Amman’s Queen ___ International Airport : ALIA
15. Law office worker, for short : PARA
16. Talented newbie : COMER
17. Home-invading Gore? : BURGLAR AL (from “burglar alarm”)
19. Opera’s birthplace : ITALY
20. Response to “Are not!” : AM TOO!
21. Señor chaser? : -ITA
23. Elevator pioneer Elisha : OTIS
24. Area for aristocrats? : GENT DISTRICT (from “garment district”)
28. Mistake : BOO-BOO
30. Bush’s labor secretary : CHAO
31. Eight fluid ounces : CUP
32. Retrovirus material : RNA
34. Obstructs, as a pipe : CLOGS
38. W.W. I novel … hinted at by 17-, 24-, 52- and 64-Across : A FAREWELL TO ARMS
43. Liszt’s “Consolation No. 3” is in it : D-FLAT
44. Story of one’s life : BIO
45. Irritating cry : CAW
46. Leading inits. in frozen desserts : TCBY
49. Visual gag character of British TV : MR BEAN
52. Exchange of vows again for the Grim Reaper? : DEATH WED OVER (from “death warmed over”)
56. Railroad chartered in 1832 : ERIE
57. Old Testament prophecy book: Abbr. : ISA
58. “X-Men” character with blue fur : BEAST
62. Remove gradually : ERODE
64. Emmy, Oscar and Grammy-winning reptile? : SNAKE CHER (from “snake charmer”)
67. Dwelling changes, in Realtor-speak : RELOS
68. “Don’t take ___ seriously!” : IT SO
69. Oscar nominee Garr : TERI
70. Neighbor of Minneapolis : EDINA
71. Keep in check, with “in” : REIN
72. Explorer’s aid : MAP

Down
1. Yeast cake made with rum : BABA
2. Eisenhower vis-à-vis West Point, informally : ALUM
3. Malicious gossip : DIRT
4. E-file preparer : CPA
5. Rower’s need : OAR
6. Alternative to a ponytail : BRAID
7. Like Latvia or Lithuania : BALTIC
8. Discovery Channel subj. : SCI
9. Razr maker : MOTOROLA
10. One instrumental in history? : AMATI
11. Old object : RELIC
12. Secret meeting : TRYST
14. To the max, ’60s-style : A GOGO
18. Editor Marshall of financial publications : LOEB
22. Residue in a fireplace : ASH
25. Oslo’s home: Abbr. : NORW
26. Hue : TONE
27. Burrito alternative : TACO
28. Yellow-brown color : BUFF
29. Translucent gem : OPAL
31. Heel : CAD
33. Edmonton’s province: Abbr. : ALB
35. Whale of a movie? : ORCA
36. Agent under Hoover, informally : G-MAN
37. Yemen-to-Zimbabwe dir. : SSW
39. Turned in, in a way : RATTED ON
40. Help make an impression? : ETCH
41. Exec’s car, maybe : LIMO
42. Star of “Fringe,” Anna ___ : TORV
47. Home of the Bahamas, once: Abbr. : BWI
48. Emphatic affirmative : YES, SIR!
50. Early film star Daniels : BEBE
51. Put up : ERECT
52. Caterpillar rival : DEERE
53. Acted in a human way? : ERRED
54. Need for some fish dishes : AIOLI
55. Beatrice’s adorer : DANTE
59. “Excuse me” : AHEM
60. Lab fluids : SERA
61. Excursion : TRIP
63. Finnish hockey star Tikkanen : ESA
65. “Try ___ might …” : AS I
66. ___-Tiki : KON

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