0223-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Feb 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Vic Fleming
THEME: Reel-Life Anniversary … today’s puzzle was constructed by Vic Fleming and is all about Vic’s namesake, the film director Victor Fleming who was born 125 years ago today. The themed answers are all titles of movies directed by Fleming:

24A. *1939 Judy Garland film : THE WIZARD OF OZ
37A. *1933 Jean Harlow film : BOMBSHELL
54A. *1943 Spencer Tracy/Irene Dunne film : A GUY NAMED JOE
68A. *1939 Vivien Leigh/Clark Gable film : GONE WITH THE WIND
89A. *1942 Spencer Tracy/Hedy Lamarr film : TORTILLA FLAT
103A. *1948 Ingrid Bergman film : JOAN OF ARC
5D. *1932 Clark Gable/Jean Harlow film : RED DUST
98D. *1925 Percy Marmont film : LORD JIM
119A. Director of the eight starred films in this puzzle, who was born on 2/23/1889 : VICTOR FLEMING

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 43s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Bush judicial appointee : ROBERTS
John Roberts is the 17th Chief Justice of the United States. Roberts was a nominee of President George W. Bush and assumed office in 2005. President Bush first proposed Roberts as an Associate Justice to replace the retiring Sandra Day O’Connor. However, Chief Justice Rehnquist died before Roberts could be confirmed, so President Bush instead nominated Roberts for the vacant Chief Justice seat.

15. Bush judicial appointee : ALITO
Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

20. Professional tennis since 1968 : OPEN ERA
In the sport of tennis, the Grand Slam tournaments were opened up to professional players, and not just amateurs, in 1968. So, the period since 1968 has been called “The Open Era”.

21. Rank : ECHELON
We use the word “echelon” (ech.) to describe a rank, particularly in the military. The term comes from French, in which language it has the same meaning, although the original meaning in Old French is “rung of a ladder”.

22. Singer with the album “Live at the Polynesian Palace” : DON HO
Don Ho apparently had a pretty liberal arrangement with his wife. When Ho was touring with his two backing singers, Patti Swallie and Elizabeth Guevara, all three of them shared a room together. He had two children with each of his roommates, giving a total of ten kids including the six he had with his wife. The arrangement was quite open, it seems, with all ten kids visiting each other regularly. To each his own …

24. *1939 Judy Garland film : THE WIZARD OF OZ
The movie “The Wizard of Oz” is full of irony. The Scarecrow wants to be intelligent and discovers he is already very smart. The Tin Man wants to be able to love and finds out that he already has a heart. The Lion thinks he is a coward but turns out to be fearless. And the big reveal is that the Wizard of Oz, who is positioned as all-powerful, is actually just a bumbling and eccentric old man.

27. One-named designer : ERTE
Erté was the pseudonym of French artist (Russian born) Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials “R.T.”

36. Slaughter in the 1946 World Series : ENOS
Enos Slaughter has a remarkable playing record in Major League Baseball over a 19-year career. Slaughter’s record is particularly remarkable given that he left baseball for three years to serve in the military during WWII.

37. *1933 Jean Harlow film : BOMBSHELL
“Bombshell” is a 1933 screwball comedy starring Jean Harlow as an actress who has been publicized as a sexy vamp but who just wants live a normal life. The actress, Lola, flees Hollywood and falls in love with a romantic (and wealthy) man, and they all live happily ever after. And, after the success of the film, Jean Harlow was forever to be known as the “Blonde Bombshell”.

41. Gator’s tail? : -ADE
Gatorade was developed at the University of Florida by a team of researchers at the request of the school’s football team. And so, Gatorade is named after the Gators football team.

43. D-backs, on scoreboards : ARI
The Arizona Diamondbacks joined Major League Baseball’s National League in 1998. By winning the World Series in 2001, the Diamondbacks became the fastest expansion team to do so in Major League history.

54. *1943 Spencer Tracy/Irene Dunne film : A GUY NAMED JOE
“A Guy Named Joe” is a 1943 film starring Spencer Tracy and Irene Dunne about a bomber pilot who dies during WWII. The pilot’s spirit lives on after his death, eventually helping his pilot girlfriend (played by Dunne) to bomb a huge Japanese ammunition dump. “A Guy Named Joe” was remade by Steven Spielberg in 1989 under the title “Always”, starring Richard Dreyfuss and Holly Hunter in the lead roles.

60. Self-absorbed sort : SOLIPSIST
Solipsism is the idea that the “self” is the only reality, or the only reality that can be verified. Everything existing outside of one’s mind is uncertain. Some solipsists go as far as to assert that other minds and the word itself do not actually exist. The term “solipsism” comes from the Latin “solus” meaning “alone” and “ipse” meaning “self”.

67. Sprint competitor, once : GTE
GTE was a rival to AT&T, the largest of the independent competitors to the Bell System. GTE merged with Bell Atlantic in 2000 to form the company that we know today as Verizon.

68. *1939 Vivien Leigh/Clark Gable film : GONE WITH THE WIND
As casting proceeded for the movie version of “Gone With the Wind”, Clark Gable was a shoo-in from day one. The role of Scarlett was considered very desirable in the acting community, with Bette Davis on the shortlist, and Katherine Hepburn demanding an appointment with producer David O. Selznick to discuss the role. Vivien Leigh was an unlikely contender, an English actress for the definitive Southern belle role. Selznick was adamant though, and stuck by his choice despite a lot of protests.

73. ___ king : A LA
A dish prepared “a la king” (usually chicken or turkey), is food prepared in a cream sauce, with mushrooms, pimentos, green peppers and sherry.

78. 2000s events in North Korea, for short : N-TESTS
North Korea has made three tests of nuclear weapons, in 2006, 2009 and 2013. All tests took place at the Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site in the very north of the country. Construction started on the test site way back in 1958 with the assistance of the Soviet Union.

85. Court grp. : USTA
The United States Tennis Association (USTA) is the national organization governing the sport of tennis in the US.

88. Footnote abbr. : OP CIT
Op. cit. is short for “opus citatum”, Latin for “the work cited”. Op. cit. is used in footnotes to refer the reader to an earlier citation. It is similar to “ibid”, except that ibid refers the reader to the last citation, the one immediately above.

89. *1942 Spencer Tracy/Hedy Lamarr film : TORTILLA FLAT
“Tortilla Flat” was the first of John Steinbeck’s novels to become a commercial success, published in 1935. The novel was made into a film of the same name in 1942 starring Spencer Tracy and Hedy Lamarr (with Akim Tamiroff playing Pablo).

94. When repeated, a Polynesian capital : PAGO
Pago Pago is the capital of American Samoa in the South Pacific. The island was used by the US Navy during WWII and it managed to escape most of the conflict. The only military incident of consequence was the shelling of the city’s harbor by a Japanese submarine. A more devastating event was the tsunami that hit Pago Pago and surrounding areas in 2009, causing widespread damage and numerous deaths.

96. Drinkers’ toasts : SKOALS
Skoal is a Swedish toast, with roots in the old Norse word “skaal” meaning “cup”.

97. Brother of George W. and Jeb : NEIL
Neil is the fourth child (of six) of former President George Herbert Walker Bush. Neil is a businessman living in Texas.

102. Snow queen in Disney’s “Frozen” : ELSA
“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

103. *1948 Ingrid Bergman film : JOAN OF ARC
“Joan of Arc” is a 1948 epic drama starring Ingrid Bergman in the title role. Bergman had wanted to play Joan for several years, but the movie itself received a very tepid reception. Famed director Victor Fleming directed “Joan of Arc”, and was very unhappy with the film that was eventually released. Rumors were that Bergman and Fleming had a “fling” during production of the film. Some speculate that the doomed relationship and box office failure led to Fleming’s fatal heart attack that occurred just after the film was released.

108. eBay user : BIDDER
eBay was founded in 1995 as AuctionWeb as part of a computer programmer’s personal website. One of the first items purchased was a broken laser pointer, for $14.83. The buyer collected broken laser pointers …

111. Like Christiane Amanpour, by upbringing : IRANIAN
Christiane Amanpour is a marvelous television journalist who is Chief International Correspondent for CNN. Amanpur was born in London, but raised in Tehran.

119. Director of the eight starred films in this puzzle, who was born on 2/23/1889 : VICTOR FLEMING
Victor Fleming was a prolific Hollywood movie director, the winner of two Best Director Oscars (for “The Wizard of Oz” and “Gone with the Wind”). Prior to starting his Hollywood career, Fleming served with the US Army’s photographic unit during WWI. He was President Woodrow Wilson’s Chief Photographer during the talks that led to the Treaty of Versailles at the end of war.

123. Torrey Pines Golf Course locale : LA JOLLA
The name of the city of La Jolla is often said to be a corruption of the Spanish “La Joya” meaning “the jewel”, giving rise to the city’s nickname “Jewel City”. Scholars dispute this etymology, but it makes for good marketing.

Torrey Pines Golf Course sits on the Pacific Coast in La Jolla in Southern California. The course takes its name from a rare tree found in the area called the Torrey Pine.

127. Brooks Robinson’s team : ORIOLES
Brooks Robinson played baseball for the Baltimore Orioles for the whole of his MLB career, from 1955 to 1977. Many believe that Robinson was the great defensive third baseman to play the game. He was given the nickname “The Human Vacuum Cleaner” for his ability to “suck up” ground balls.

128. Sitcom with a 1974 wedding : RHODA
The seventies sitcom “Rhoda” was a spinoff of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” that starred Valerie Harper. The eighth episode of the show was an hour-long special in which Rhoda married her fiance Joe (played by David Groh). At the time of airing it was the second-most watched television episode in history, second only to the 1953 birth of Little Ricky on “I Love Lucy”.

130. Source of the line “What’s past is prologue,” with “The” : TEMPEST
William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” tells the story of Prospero, who was removed from the throne of Milan and banished to a deserted island along with his daughter Miranda. Prospero learns sorcery while cast away, and eventually conjures up a tempest that drives those who usurped his throne onto the island’s shores (in particular his own brother, Antonio). On the island, Prospero is eventually successful in revealing Antonio’s lowly nature.

Down
1. Massage therapeutically : ROLF
Rolfing is a trademarked massage technique, developed by Ida Pauline Rolf in the fifties.

4. Put into a sepulcher : ENTOMB
A sepulcher is a burial vault.

5. *1932 Clark Gable/Jean Harlow film : RED DUST
“Mogambo” is a 1953 film noted for its spectacular scenes set in the African jungle. “Mogambo” is actually a remake of a 1932 movie called “Red Dust”. Gable plays the romantic lead in both the original and the remake, even though they are filmed 21 years apart. Gable gets involved with Jean Harlow and Mary Astor in the original, and with a Ava Gardner and Grace Kelly in the remake.

8. Migratory seabird : PETREL
The migratory seabird called the petrel is known for hovering just above the waves, with feet barely touching the water. This behavior gives rise the name “petrel” after the Christian Saint Peter, as Peter was said to have walked on the water.

9. Vier + vier : ACHT
In German, two times four (vier) is eight (acht).

10. What Babe wants to be in “Babe” : SHEEPDOG
The hit 1995 film “Babe” was produced and filmed in Australia. The movie is an adaptation of a 1983 novel called “The Sheep-Pig” written by Dick King-Smith. “Babe” was a smash hit at the box office and was extremely well received by the critics. The film was nominated for the Best Picture Oscar, but lost out to “Braveheart”. However, it did win the Oscar for Best Visual Effects by beating out “Apollo 13”, which was an amazing feat, I’d say…

12. New Haven reuner : ELI
Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

13. “Frasier” role : ROZ
Roz Doyle is a character in the wonderful sitcom “Frasier”. Roz is played, very ably, by the actress Peri Gilpin.

14. Major glitch : SNAFU
SNAFU is an acronym standing for Situation Normal: All Fouled Up (well, that’s the “polite” version!). As you might imagine, the term developed in the US Army, during WWII.

16. Things that should be tied up by the curtain? : LOOSE ENDS
Loose ends in the plot of the play should be tied up by the final curtain hopefully.

25. Beatles title girl : RITA
“Lovely Rita” is a Beatles song on the “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” album. When the album was released in 1967, the term “meter maid” wasn’t used in the UK, although it was a slang term used in the US. The song helped spread the usage of “meter maid” all around the English-speaking world. Apparently the inspiration for the song was McCartney getting a parking ticket one day outside the Abbey Road Studios. He accepted the ticket with good grace, from a warden named Meta Davis. McCartney felt that Meta “looked like a Rita”, so that was the name she was given in the song.

27. Queen of literature : ELLERY
The Ellery Queen series of detective novels was somewhat unique in that Ellery Queen was the hero of the tales, and was also the pen name of the author. Actually, the “author” was a pair of writers; two cousins from Brooklyn, New York.

45. Fortunetelling aids : TAROTS
Tarot cards have been around since the mid-1400s, and for centuries were simply used for entertainment as a game. It has only been since the late 1800s that the cards have been used by fortune tellers to predict the future.

46. 1980s-’90s series based on the fictional firm McKenzie, Brackman, Chaney and Kuzak : LA LAW
“L.A. Law” ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network’s most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful “Hill Street Blues” in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, “E.R.” The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

50. Head to Paris? : TETE
“Tête” is the French word for “head”.

57. Wiry-coated terriers : SCOTTIES
Scottish Terrier is another name for the Aberdeen Terrier, commonly referred to as the Scottie. One of the most famous Scotties in American history was Fala, the much-loved dog belonging to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Also, the Scottie is famous as one of the playing pieces in the original game of Monopoly.

59. Lead-in to Pen, commercially : EPI-
EpiPen is a brand name of epinephrine auto-injector. An EpiPen delivers a measured dose of epinephrine, usually for the treatment of an allergic reaction.

62. Genuflect : KNEEL
Our word “to genuflect” means “to bend the knee, in worship”. The term comes to us via French from the Latin “genu” meaning “knee” and “flectere” meaning “to bend”.

64. Night that “Friends” aired: Abbr. : THU
The remarkably successful sitcom “Friends” was created by David Crane and Marta Kauffman. For the first season, the six lead characters were each paid $22,500 per episode. That salary had increased to $1 million per episode by the show’s last season.

65. Swashbuckles, say : STRUTS
A “swashbuckler” is a flashy swordsman. The term probably derives somehow from “swash” meaning “fall of a blow” and “buckler”, the name of a small round shield.

72. “Ed Wood” star : DEPP
Ed Wood was a screenwriter, director, producer and actor who made a lot of low-budget films during the 1950s. Wood worked a lot with the actor Bela Lugosi and when Lugosi passed away, the popularity of Wood’s film died off with his star. Tim Burton made a biopic about the life and career of Ed Wood that was released in 1994, a movie that was simply called “Ed Wood”.

Movie director and producer Tim Burton makes my least favorite types of movie: dark, gothic, horror fantasies. The list of his titles includes “Edward Scissorhands”, “Sleepy Hollow”, “Sweeney Todd”, “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” and “Alice in Wonderland”. Also included in each of these movies is Johnny Depp in a starring role, as Depp and Burton are good friends and frequent collaborators. Another frequent star in Burton movies is English actress Helena Bonham Carter, who has been his domestic partner since 2001.

74. 1960s U.S. bombing target : LAOS
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country’s name is “Meuang Lao”. The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of “Lao” entities united into one, the French added the “S” and so today we tend to use “Laos” instead of “Lao”.

79. Milan’s La ___ : SCALA
The La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its name: “Teatro alla Scala” in Italian.

86. Joint parts : TENONS
One simple type of joint used in carpentry is a mortise and tenon, basically a projection carved at the end of one piece of wood that fits into a hole cut into the end of another. The mortise is the “hole” and the tenon is the “projection”.

90. Give off coherent light : LASE
“To lase” means “to use a laser”.

The term “laser” comes from an acronym, “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation” (LASER). It has been pointed out that a more precise name for laser technology is “Light Oscillation by Stimulated Emission of Radiation”, but the resulting acronym isn’t quite so appealing, namely LOSER …

98. *1925 Percy Marmont film : LORD JIM
“Lord Jim” is a novel by Joseph Conrad that was twice adapted for the big screen. The 1925 silent film version starred Percy Marmont in the title role, and the 1965 version featured Peter O’Toole as the lead.

101. One way to the top : T-BAR
A T-bar is a type of ski lift in which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There’s also a J-bar, a similar device, but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

103. Pub measure : JIGGER
A jigger is a 1.5 ounce shot glass.The term “jigger” was originally used for an illicit distillery in the 1800s.

104. 1960s western sitcom : F TROOP
Relatively few people outside of the US saw the American sitcom “F Troop”, which was made in the sixties. I remember watching the show as a young lad because it was picked up by the Irish national television service. The only other country that showed “F Troop” was Australia.

106. ___ Heep (Dickens character) : URIAH
Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel “David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens. The character is such a “yes man” that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a “Uriah Heep”.

107. Blade brand : X-ACTO
The X-Acto knife was invented in the thirties by a Polish immigrant, although his intention was to come up with a scalpel for surgeons. The knife couldn’t cut it (pun intended!) as a scalpel though, because it was difficult to clean. The inventor’s brother-in law suggested it be used as a craft knife, and it is still around today.

109. Red opening? : INFRA-
At either end of the visible light spectrum are the invisible forms of radiation known as infrared (IR) light and ultraviolet (UV) light. IR light lies just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum, and UV light lie just below the violet end.

114. “Render ___ Caesar …” : UNTO
According to the gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke in the Christian New Testament, Jesus was asked if taxes should be paid to the Roman authorities who ruled Judea. He asked for a Roman coin and noted the image of Caesar thereon. Jesus then said “Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar’s; and unto God the things that are God’s”.

116. Shelfmate of Vogue : ELLE
“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”.

118. Place for a topgallant : MAST
Topgallant sails are found on square rigged sailing vessels. The topgallant sails are near the top of the mast, and there are usually one or two of them per mast.

121. Green monitor, for short? : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Bush judicial appointee : ROBERTS
8. Quarterbacks, often : PASSERS
15. Bush judicial appointee : ALITO
20. Professional tennis since 1968 : OPEN ERA
21. Rank : ECHELON
22. Singer with the album “Live at the Polynesian Palace” : DON HO
23. Time for the best deals, maybe, in a going-out-of-business sale : LAST DAY
24. *1939 Judy Garland film : THE WIZARD OF OZ
26. There was a great one in Genesis : FLOOD
27. One-named designer : ERTE
28. Lava comes out of it : FISSURE
29. Kind of car or tee : MUSCLE
32. Appear suddenly : POP OUT
36. Slaughter in the 1946 World Series : ENOS
37. *1933 Jean Harlow film : BOMBSHELL
40. “Nuts!” : DARN!
41. Gator’s tail? : -ADE
43. D-backs, on scoreboards : ARI
44. Daily riser : TIDE
45. How things may be brought : TO HEEL
47. Pass : ENACT
51. Restful places : INNS
53. Each : PER
54. *1943 Spencer Tracy/Irene Dunne film : A GUY NAMED JOE
56. Is threatening, in a way : LOOMS
58. Colorist : DYER
60. Self-absorbed sort : SOLIPSIST
61. Hit : STRUCK
63. Some kitchenware : POTS
66. Call from a curb : TAXI!
67. Sprint competitor, once : GTE
68. *1939 Vivien Leigh/Clark Gable film : GONE WITH THE WIND
73. ___ king : A LA
76. Sprint : TEAR
77. Word of agreement : SURE
78. 2000s events in North Korea, for short : N-TESTS
82. Provider of music on the go? : CAR STEREO
85. Court grp. : USTA
88. Footnote abbr. : OP CIT
89. *1942 Spencer Tracy/Hedy Lamarr film : TORTILLA FLAT
92. Odist’s preposition : ERE
94. When repeated, a Polynesian capital : PAGO
95. Publish : ISSUE
96. Drinkers’ toasts : SKOALS
97. Brother of George W. and Jeb : NEIL
99. Award for Miss Hawaii, in addition to a tiara : LEI
100. Summer hrs. : DST
102. Snow queen in Disney’s “Frozen” : ELSA
103. *1948 Ingrid Bergman film : JOAN OF ARC
105. Elegance : LUXE
108. eBay user : BIDDER
110. Certain newspaper advertisement : INSERT
111. Like Christiane Amanpour, by upbringing : IRANIAN
113. Pub containers : MUGS
115. Perfect, as a home : DREAM
119. Director of the eight starred films in this puzzle, who was born on 2/23/1889 : VICTOR FLEMING
123. Torrey Pines Golf Course locale : LA JOLLA
125. Suffer humiliation, in slang : EAT IT
126. Comeback : RIPOSTE
127. Brooks Robinson’s team : ORIOLES
128. Sitcom with a 1974 wedding : RHODA
129. Foreign traveler’s purchase, maybe : ADAPTOR
130. Source of the line “What’s past is prologue,” with “The” : TEMPEST

Down
1. Massage therapeutically : ROLF
2. ___-blue : OPAL
3. “I should ___ lucky” : BE SO
4. Put into a sepulcher : ENTOMB
5. *1932 Clark Gable/Jean Harlow film : RED DUST
6. La-la lead-in : TRA
7. Perhaps : SAY
8. Migratory seabird : PETREL
9. Vier + vier : ACHT
10. What Babe wants to be in “Babe” : SHEEPDOG
11. Finish (up) : SEW
12. New Haven reuner : ELI
13. “Frasier” role : ROZ
14. Major glitch : SNAFU
15. Puts together : ADDS
16. Things that should be tied up by the curtain? : LOOSE ENDS
17. Playfully : IN FUN
18. Complete, informally : THORO
19. Transudes : OOZES
25. Beatles title girl : RITA
27. Queen of literature : ELLERY
30. Send off : SHIP
31. Gave up : CEDED
33. Birthplace of 22-Across : OAHU
34. Hunts, with “on” : PREYS
35. Lacking variety : ONE-NOTE
37. Gives up, in slang : BAILS
38. “Then again, I could be wrong” : OR NOT
39. Adult’s counterpart : MINOR
42. Obsessed with : DEEP INTO
45. Fortunetelling aids : TAROTS
46. 1980s-’90s series based on the fictional firm McKenzie, Brackman, Chaney and Kuzak : LA LAW
48. Doing ___ (dancing springily) : A JIG
49. Basis in accounting : COST
50. Head to Paris? : TETE
52. Overly confident : SMUG
55. Recipe instruction : MIX IN
57. Wiry-coated terriers : SCOTTIES
59. Lead-in to Pen, commercially : EPI-
62. Genuflect : KNEEL
64. Night that “Friends” aired: Abbr. : THU
65. Swashbuckles, say : STRUTS
69. Some London lords : EARLS
70. Effected, in a bad way : WREAKED
71. “___ ba-a-ack!” : HE’S
72. “Ed Wood” star : DEPP
73. When the story begins, perhaps : ACT I
74. 1960s U.S. bombing target : LAOS
75. Flight board info: Abbr. : ARRS
79. Milan’s La ___ : SCALA
80. Go-getter : TIGER
81. Unemotive : STOIC
83. Means of access to a cafeteria, maybe : STUDENT ID
84. In past centuries : OF OLD
86. Joint parts : TENONS
87. Specialties : AREAS
90. Give off coherent light : LASE
91. Overreacting sort : ALARMIST
93. Essen article : EINE
98. *1925 Percy Marmont film : LORD JIM
101. One way to the top : T-BAR
103. Pub measure : JIGGER
104. 1960s western sitcom : F TROOP
105. Chopped ___ : LIVER
106. ___ Heep (Dickens character) : URIAH
107. Blade brand : X-ACTO
109. Red opening? : INFRA-
112. Bit : IOTA
114. “Render ___ Caesar …” : UNTO
116. Shelfmate of Vogue : ELLE
117. Tavern stock : ALES
118. Place for a topgallant : MAST
120. Lash holder : LID
121. Green monitor, for short? : EPA
122. Finish (up) : MOP
123. Fate : LOT
124. “___ we done?” : ARE

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