1110-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Nov 13, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan Olschwang
THEME: Bye-Lines … today’s themed answers are all “bye lines”, lines used by famous people or characters to close a show:

23A. The Lone Ranger : HI-YO, SILVER! AWAY!
47A. Roger Ebert : THE BALCONY IS CLOSED
64A. Porky Pig : THTHTHTH THAT’S ALL FOLKS!
79A. George Burns : SAY GOODNIGHT, GRACIE
109A. Red Skelton : AND MAY GOD BLESS

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 32m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … MUS (Mas), ULALUME (Alalume)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Former Belgian national airline : SABENA
Sabena was the national airline of Belgium until it went bankrupt in 2001. The name Sabena was an acronym for “Belgian Corporation for Air Navigation Services” (in French!). I remember when Sabena was doing everything it could to lower costs, partnering with other small airlines and trying to survive. I once took a bizarre transatlantic flight on a joint Sabena-British Caledonian flight. The cabin of the Boeing 747 aircraft was outfitted on the left side with Sabena colors and staff, and on the right with British Caledonian colors and staff. I was lucky enough to be seated on the Scottish side of the plane, as British Caledonian was a lovely, lovely airline … before it was gobbled up by British Airways.

14. Cremona craftwork : AMATIS
The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, they were succeeded by Girolamo’s son, Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

Cremona is a city in Lombardy in northern Italy that lies on the Po River. Cremona has a rich musical history and was the home to famous craftsmen who made stringed instruments, including Stradivari and several members of the Amati family.

20. Origami staples : CRANES
Origami is the traditional Japanese art form of paper folding. The word “origami” is derived from “ori“ (folding) and “kami” (paper).

21. 1993 5x platinum Nirvana album : IN UTERO
Nirvana is a rock band, formed in Washington in 1987 by Kurt Cobain and Krist Novoselic. The band effectively disbanded in 1994 after Cobain committed suicide.

22. Wise guy : SAVANT
A “savant” is a learned person. The term “savant” can also be short for “idiot savant”, the outdated name for someone with a mental disability but who has above-normal capabilities in perhaps calculation or musical expression.

23. The Lone Ranger : HI-YO, SILVER! AWAY!
“The Lone Ranger” was both a radio and television show, dating back to its first radio performance in 1933 on a Detroit station. The line “Hi-yo, Silver! Away!” was a device used in the storyline to signal that a riding sequence was starting, so cue the music!

25. Phillip, e.g., in Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty” : PRINCE
The 1959 Disney animated feature “Sleeping Beauty” was an adaptation of the 1697 Charles Perrault version of the classic fairytale. The soundtrack of the movie drew on the wonderful 1890 “Sleeping Beauty” ballet by Tchaikovsky. The Disney film took up almost the entire decade of the fifties in production, with work on the story beginning in 1951. The voices were recorded in 1952, and then it took from 1953 to 1958 to produce all of the hand-inked animation.

26. Carrier inits. : UAL
United Airlines used the tagline “Fly the Friendly Skies” in its marketing materials from 1965 to 1996. It was then replaced with “It’s time to fly”. United chose George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” as the company’s theme music in 1976, and paid the Gershwin estate a fee of $500,000 for the privilege.

27. Kemo ___ (the Lone Ranger) : SABE
“Kemosabe” is a term used by the Tonto character in the iconic radio and television program “The Lone Ranger”. “Kemosabe” doesn’t really mean anything outside of the show, and in fact was written as “ke-mo sah-bee” in the original radio show scripts. The term was created by longtime director of “The Lone Ranger”, Jim Jewell. To come up with the term, Jewell used the name of a boy’s camp that his father-in-law established called Kamp Kee-Mo Sah-Bee.

35. Hospital supply : SERUM
Blood serum is the clear, yellowish part of blood i.e. that part which is neither a blood cell or a clotting factor. Included in blood serum are antibodies, the proteins that are central to our immune system. Blood serum from animals that have immunity to some disease can be transferred to another individual, hence providing that second individual with some level of immunity. Blood serum used to pass on immunity can be called “antiserum”.

37. ___ Fáil, Ireland’s coronation stone : LIA
The “Lia Fáil” is the coronation stone that is found on the Hill of Tara, the traditional seat of the High Kings of Ireland. “Lia Fáil” translates from Irish as “stone of destiny”.

39. Massachusetts motto starter : ENSE
The motto of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is “Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem”, a Latin phrase that can be translated as “By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty”. The quotation is from a passage written by English politician Algernon Sidney who was executed for treason by King Charles II.

47. Roger Ebert : THE BALCONY IS CLOSED
“The balcony is closed” was the line used to close the movie review show “At the Movies” that was hosted for many years by Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel. Siskel and Ebert used to sit in the balcony of a movie theater while commenting on the films.

52. 84-Down writer’s monogram : EAP
Edgar Allan Poe lived a life of many firsts. Poe is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn’t really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious from either drugs or alcohol. Poe died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

55. Trig ratio : COTAN
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent. Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The “reciprocal” of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent. These inverted ratios should not be confused with the “inverse” trigonometric functions e.g. arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. These inverse functions are the reverse of the sine, cosine and tangent. For example, the arctangent can be read as “What angle is equivalent to the following ration of opposite over adjacent?”

59. Old camera settings, for short : ASAS
ASA stands for the American Standards Association, and is a term used for the “speed” of a photographic film. Film speed is a measure of its sensitivity to light. High speed film is used in very low light conditions, but it tends to be very “grainy”.

62. François Truffaut’s field : CINE
Francois Truffaut was a celebrated French filmmaker, so one might see his movies in “le cine:, short for “le cinema”.

64. Porky Pig : THTHTHTH THAT’S ALL FOLKS!
Porky Pig was the first of the characters created by Warner Bros. to become a hit with audiences. Porky Pig is the guy with the line at the end of each cartoon, “Th-th-th-that’s all folks!” If you don’t mind a little adult language, there’s a very funny 11-second Porky Pig clip that the studio released on a blooper reel in 1938. Porky Pig stutters out “Son of g-g-gun”, only he doesn’t say “gun” …

70. Cato’s man : HOMO
“Homo” is Latin for “man”.

Cato the Elder was a Roman statesman, known historically as “the elder” in order to distinguish him from his great-grandson, Cato the Younger. Cato the Elder’s ultimate position within Roman society was that of Censor, making him responsible for maintaining the census, and for supervising public morality.

71. When doubled, one of the Teletubbies : LAA
“Teletubbies” is a children’s television show produced by the BBC in the UK and shown over here on PBS. The show attracted a lot of attention in 1999 when Jerry Falwell suggested that one of the Teletubbies characters, Tinky Winky, was a homosexual role model for children.

72. “Now!” : STAT!
The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turnaround time”.

73. “August: ___ County” (2008 Pulitzer winner for Drama) : OSAGE
“August: Osage County” is a dark comedy play by Tracy Letts that won a 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. There is a movie adaptation in the works that stars Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts.

74. “S.N.L.” alum Cheri : OTERI
Cheri Oteri was the SNL cast member who regularly appeared with Will Farrell in the skit featuring a pair of Spartan cheerleaders.

78. July third? : ELL
The third letter of the word “July” is L (ell).

79. George Burns : SAY GOODNIGHT, GRACIE
George Burns was the stage name of comedian and actor Nathan Birnbaum. Famously, Burns was married to Gracie Allen, who initially acted as “straight man” in their double act. The duo found that they got more laughs with Gracie acting as “Dumb Dora”, an arrangement that Burns and Allen stuck to for decades.

83. Genus of small rodents : MUS
Mus is a genus of small mammal in the order of rodents that includes the common house mouse.

88. Mille ___ (part of Québec with a rhyming name) : ILES
Mille-Îles is an electoral district in Quebec.

98. Something you want to come down from quickly : BAD TRIP
A “bad trip” is a disturbing experience caused by the use of a psychedelic drug, such as LSD.

102. Dry: Prefix : XERO-
“Xero” is the Greek word for dry. “Xerosis”, for example, is the medical term for “dry skin”.

103. Home of Banff National Park : ALBERTA
Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada is located high in the Canadian Rockies and is a popular tourist destination. The town of Banff and the surrounding park were given their name in 1884 by then president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, George Stephen. He named Banff for his birthplace of Banffshire in Scotland.

105. 2004 Chevy debut : AVEO
I think that the Aveo was introduced in 2002, and 2004 as asserted in the clue …

The Chevrolet Aveo is a subcompact that has been around since 2002. The Aveo is manufactured by GM Daewoo, the GM subsidiary in South Korea. Although the Aveo name is still used in some markets, here in North America the Aveo has been sold as the Chevrolet Sonic since 2012. By the way, GM Daewoo is the third largest manufacturer of automobiles in South Korea, after Hyundai and Kia.

108. Beefeaters, e.g. : GUARDS
“Beefeater” is the popular name for a Yeoman Warder of the Tower of London. The official responsibility of a beefeater is to guard any prisoners in the Tower, and to look after the crown jewels. But the cadre of beefeaters actually spend their day guiding tours around the magnificent castle. No one really knows where the origin of the name “beefeater”. Any time you are in London, be sure to check out the Tower. As you leave the Tower, turn left and walk down to the river. There you can catch a water taxi to Westminster which will take you by St. Paul’s and drop you off at the Houses of Parliament, just around the corner from Westminster Abbey. A great day out …

109. Red Skelton : AND MAY GOD BLESS
Red Skelton was an American comedian who started out in show business as a teenager working with the circus. Skelton had a very successful career on radio before moving to television in the early fifties. His popularity only began to fade in the early seventies, when he had difficulty appealing to younger audiences. Skelton spent less time performing in his latter years, and turned to his other great love … painting.

112. Record of the Year Grammy nominee for “Lose Yourself” : EMINEM
Eminem’s real name is Marshall Mathers, a native of Saint Joseph, Missouri. Mathers grew up poor, raised by a single-mom as the family was abandoned by his father when he was 18 months old. Marshall and his mother moved around the country before settling in a suburb of Detroit. He didn’t do well at school, and dropped out at the age of 17. But in the end he made it pretty big …

113. Primary pigment for printers : MAGENTA
Four-color printing uses four different color inks: cyan, magenta, yellow and black. The black ink is also known as the “key”. The first letters of the colors (with black being”key”) give the more common name for four-color printing, namely CMYK.

114. Rays’ div. : AL EAST
The Tampa Bay Rays is a relatively “young” franchise, being formed in 1998. The initial name of the franchise was the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. and while known as the Devil Rays the team finished last in the league in almost every year. The name was changed to the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008, and I am told the Rays started into a streak of winning seasons soon after.

115. Luna’s counterpart : SELENE
“Luna” is the Latin word for “moon”, and is the name given to the Roman moon goddess. The Greek equivalent of Luna was Selene. Luna had a temple on the Aventine Hill in Rome but it was destroyed during the Great Fire that raged during the reign of Nero.

116. Auto steering system components : TIE RODS
Tie rods are part of the rack and pinion steering mechanism in a car.

Down
1. Downhill run : SCHUSS
A schuss is a very fast run downhill in skiing, not taking any turns to slow the pace of the descent. “Schuss” is a German word for “shot”.

2. Massenet opera based on Greek myth : ARIANE
“Ariane” was not the most successful work by Jules Massenet, that’s for sure. “Ariane” has rarely been performed since its opening in 1906 in Paris. A few years after the debut of “Ariane”, Massenet introduced most of the same characters in another opera named “Bacchus”. “Bacchus” doesn’t get performed much either …

3. Bears’ home in Texas : BAYLOR
Remember Ken Starr of Whitewater fame? Starr is now President of Baylor University in Waco, Texas.

4. 2005 Drama Pulitzer finalist Will : ENO
Will Eno is an American playwright working in Brooklyn, New York. That said, Eno’s plays are mainly produced across the pond in the UK.

5. Costner role : NESS
Eliot Ness was portrayed by Kevin Costner in “The Untouchables” (good movie).

Eliot Ness was the Treasury agent charged with the task of bringing down the notorious Chicago gangster Al Capone. When Ness took on the job in 1930, Chicago law-enforcement agents were renowned for being corrupt, for being on the take. Ness handpicked 50 prohibition agents who he thought he could rely on, later reducing the group to a cadre of 15 and ultimately just 11 trusted men. That group of 11 earned the nickname “The Untouchables”, the agents who couldn’t be bought.

Kevin Costner attributes some of his motivation to pursue an acting career to the great Welsh actor, Richard Burton. Back when Costner was taking acting classes, and was undecided about whether to continue chasing his dream, he ran into Burton on a flight from Puerto Vallarta. Burton agreed to chat with him for a little while, and so Costner was able to ask him if acting meant tolerating the kind of personal drama that had plagued Burton’s own life. Burton told him, “You have green eyes. I have green eyes. I think you’ll be fine”.

9. Nickname for Huntington Beach, Calif. : SURF CITY
The city of Huntington Beach in Southern California is noted for its consistent, year-round surfing conditions, earning it the nickname “Surf City”. The waves coming ashore are enhanced as they swing around Santa Catalina Island that lies about 26 miles offshore.

10. Bologna’s place : ITALIA
Bologna is a city in northern Italy. The city is home to the University of Bologna that was founded way back in 1088. The University of Bologna is the oldest existing university in the world.

12. “Time ___” (bygone sci-fi series) : TRAX
“Time Trax” was a sci-fi TV show that first aired in 1993, a joint American/Australian production.

14. Defames : ASPERSES
To asperse is to spread false charges or make insinuations. The more common expression is “to cast aspersions”. “To asperse” comes from the Latin “aspergere” meaning “to sprinkle”. So, “to asperse” is also the term used when sprinkling holy water.

15. One of the von Trapp girls : MARTA
Baron Georg Johannes von Trapp was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian Navy who achieved worldwide fame when his family became the inspiration for the musical “The Sound of Musical”.

“The Sound of Music” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers”, a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war and one family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives here in the same town in which I reside in California.

19. First Mets manager : STENGEL
Casey Stengel was a professional baseball player, playing from 1912-1925 and managing from 1934-1965. Stengel was born in Kansas City. He had German heritage, and so was called “Dutch” for much of his early life. As he acquired fame on the baseball field he was given the nickname “Casey”, largely because he came from Kansas City (“KC”) and also because of the popularity of the poem “Casey at the Bat”. He was a smart and erudite guy when it came to baseball, so sportswriters tended to call him “The Old Professor”.

24. CNBC news item : LBO
A leveraged buyout (LBO) is a transaction in which an investor acquires a controlling volume of stock in a company, but buys that stock with borrowed funds (hence “leveraged”). Often the assets of the acquired company are used as collateral for the borrowed money. There is a special form of LBO known as a management buyout (MBO) in which the company’s own management team purchases the controlling interest.

33. Keyes and King : ALANS
Alan Keyes is a conservative political activist and former diplomat. Keyes ran for US President in 1996, 2000 and 2008. In his earlier life he was an ambassador appointed by President Reagan.

Alan King was a comedian and satirist, famous for joking about his Jewish culture. He was also an actor, and starred in many movies over a 50-year period, including “I, the Jury (1982), “Author! Author!” (1982), “Casino” (1995) and “Rush Hour 2” (2001).

36. “Beowulf” quaff : MEAD
“Beowulf” is an old epic poem from England, although the story is set in Scandinavia. Beowulf fights a battle, defending the Danish King Hrothgar from the ferocious outcast Grendel. Hrothgar had built a great hall for his people in which they could celebrate; singing, dancing and drinking lots of mead. Grendel was angered by the carousing and attacked the hall, devouring many of the incumbent warriors as they slept. A bit of an extreme reaction to noisy neighbors I’d say …

38. Jesse and Leo of TV sitcoms : UNCLES
“Uncle Jesse” is the character Jesse L. Duke from the eighties sitcom “The Dukes of Hazzard”. Uncle Jesse appeared in every episode of the show, and was played by Denver Pyle, the actor who is also famous for playing Briscoe Darling on “The Andy Griffith Show”.

On the sitcom “Seinfeld”, Jerry’s eccentric maternal uncle is Leo, played by actor Len Lesser. Lesser acted in movies and television for many years, alongside some of the greats of stage and screen. He was fond of telling a marvelous story about acting in the 1973 film “Papillon” starring Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman. In his role as a prison guard, Lesser was required to shove McQueen, but McQueen didn’t think that Lesser was pushing him roughly enough. He turned to Lesser and told him “Don’t think of me as a movie star. Think of me as a character in a show”, encouraging him to be more aggressive. When McQueen walked away, Hoffman was left standing there beside Lesser. He paused and quietly said to Lesser, “Think of me as a movie star …”

47. Ópera venue : TEATRO
In Spanish, an opera (ópera) is usually seen at a theater ( teatro).

49. S. ___ Merkerson, four-time N.A.A.C.P. Image Award-winning actress : EPATHA
The actress S. Epatha Merkerson is best known for playing NYPD Lieutenant Anita Van Buren on the TV cop show “Law & Order” from 1993 to 2010. Merkerson actually appeared in more episodes of the show than any other member of the cast. The actress made her TV debut on “Pee-wee’s Playhouse”, as Reba the Mail Lady.

50. Oscar-winning Forest Whitaker role : IDI AMIN
“The Last King of Scotland” is a 2006 film adaptation of a 1998 novel of the same name by Giles Foden. The story tells of a Scottish doctor (played by James McAvoy) who was employed by Idi Amin (played by Forest Whitaker). The title of the piece comes from the fact that Idi Amin offered his services as King of Scotland, should he ever be needed.

51. Judo gyms : DOJOS
The Japanese word dojo literally means “place of the way”. Originally the term applied to training halls that were found in or beside temples. The teaching in a dojo was not limited to the martial arts, but in the Western world we use the dojo as the name for a training facility for judo, karate and the like.

56. Ancient Mexican : TOLTEC
The Aztec’s viewed the Toltec people as their cultural ancestors. In the “Aztec” language, the term “Toltec” came to mean “artisan”.

58. Company that owns Gerber : NESTLE
Nestlé is the world’s largest food company. It was founded in 1905 in Vevey, Switzerland where the company headquarters is to this day. Although the company came into being as the result of a merger, it retains the name of one of the co-founders, German confectioner Henri Nestlé. Henri Nestlé’s real breakthrough product was baby formula.

60. Layered coifs : SHAGS
A shag cut is a layered hairstyle. Meg Ryan was famous for wearing a shag cut for many years.

74. Black Hills native : OGLALA
The Oglala are a sub-tribe of the Lakota Native American people.

76. Lace’s end : AGLET
An aglet is the plastic or metal sheath that is found on the end of a shoelace or perhaps a drawstring. The name “aglet” comes from the Old French word “aguillette” meaning “needle”.

77. Vittles : GRUB
“Victuals” is a term for food that is fit for consumption. We tend to pronounce “victuals” as “vittles”, and we use the term “vittles” and “victuals” interchangeably.

81. Apple product : IPOD NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini, and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been several versions of the Nano to date. The current Nano, as well as playing tunes, has an FM player, records voice memos, and even has a pedometer!

84. Poem that ends “This ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir” : ULALUME
“Ulalume” is a poem written by Edgar Allen Poe in 1847. The poem’s line “in the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir” is quoted in another respected work, Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire”. Blanche Dubois says that her sister, Stella, lives “in the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir”, a nod to “Ulalume”.

89. “A Sentimental Journey” author : STERNE
Laurence Sterne is best known for his novel, “The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman”. It is an epic work, published in nine volumes over ten years.

91. Thomas Jefferson or Jimmy Carter, once : FARMER
I am currently reading an excellent biography of Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham called “Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power”. So far, I highly recommend it …

President Jimmy Carter is a graduate of the US Naval Academy. Carter served in the Navy on surface ships and submarines, and chose to pursue a career in the submarine service as he was interested in nuclear power and believed it had a great future in submarine design. As a result, he became an expert in nuclear propulsion. In 1952, the Navy sent the young Carter to the Chalk River Laboratories in Canada to lead the US effort to shutdown the reactor after an accident and partial meltdown of a reactor core. He and his team had to be lowered into the leaking reactor core for mechanical disassembly, staying there for only seconds at a time to minimise exposure to radiation. Decades later as US President, it was this experience that influenced Carter’s decision not to complete the development of the neutron bomb.

93. Virgil hero : AENEAS
“The Aeneid” is Virgil’s epic poem that tells of the journey of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy to become the ancestor of all Romans. “The Aeneid” begins with the words “Arma virumque cano …”, which translates as “I sing of arms and of a man …”

94. Bit of field sport equipment : CROSSE
A lacrosse stick is also known as a crosse.

Even though lacrosse was dropped from the Olympics after the 1908 games, it is currently enjoying a resurgence of popularity outside of North America.

97. Where to find “books in the running brooks,” per Shakespeare : ARDEN
“… books in the running brooks” is a phrase from William Shakespeare’s “As You Like It”.

The Forest of Arden is the setting for Shakespeare’s “As You Like It”. Even though there is a Forest of Arden surrounding Shakespeare’s home town of Stratford-on-Avon, seeing as the play is set in France one has to assume that the “As You Like It” Arden is an Anglicization of the forested “Ardennes” region that stretches from Belgium into France,and that famously featured in WWII’s Battle of the Bulge.

99. Indian melodies : RAGAS
Raga isn’t really a type of music, but has been described as the “tonal framework” in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners).

100. Nobelist writer Andric : IVO
Ivo Andrić was a novelist from former Yugoslavia who won the 1961 Nobel Prize for Literature.

104. Beginning of some temple names : B’NAI
The Hebrew word “b’nai” means “sons”.

106. Preceder of “di” or “da” in a Beatles song : OB-LA-
“Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” was one of many songs credited to Lennon/McCartney that was actually written by just one of the pair. Paul McCartney wrote this one, a song that John Lennon really did not like at all. Apparently Lennon was quite obstructionist during the recording of the song and even walked out at one point.

110. Since 1/1 : YTD
Year-to-date (YTD)

111. “___ Sylphides” (ballet) : LES
“Les Sylphides” is a 1909 ballet choreographed by Michel Fokine with music by Frédéric Chopin. The ballet is described as non-narrative meaning that it has no story but simply showcases the dancing.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Former Belgian national airline : SABENA
7. Just says no : RESISTS
14. Cremona craftwork : AMATIS
20. Origami staples : CRANES
21. 1993 5x platinum Nirvana album : IN UTERO
22. Wise guy : SAVANT
23. The Lone Ranger : HI-YO, SILVER! AWAY!
25. Phillip, e.g., in Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty” : PRINCE
26. Carrier inits. : UAL
27. Kemo ___ (the Lone Ranger) : SABE
28. Move a muscle? : FLEX
29. No longer in enemy hands : RETAKEN
30. Kind of appeal : SNOB
32. Base, e.g. : NON-ACID
34. Infusing with a soda maker : AERATING
35. Hospital supply : SERUM
37. ___ Fáil, Ireland’s coronation stone : LIA
38. Strike callers : UMPS
39. Massachusetts motto starter : ENSE
40. Dietary claim : LESS FAT
44. Deeply rooted : INBRED
46. Toothpaste type : GEL
47. Roger Ebert : THE BALCONY IS CLOSED
52. 84-Down writer’s monogram : EAP
53. Opportunities, metaphorically : DOORS
54. Hands (out) : DOLES
55. Trig ratio : COTAN
59. Old camera settings, for short : ASAS
61. Add (up) : TOT
62. François Truffaut’s field : CINE
63. Sweet-talk : CAJOLE
64. Porky Pig : THTHTHTH THAT’S ALL FOLKS!
69. Fixes up, as a run-down house : REHABS
70. Cato’s man : HOMO
71. When doubled, one of the Teletubbies : LAA
72. “Now!” : STAT!
73. “August: ___ County” (2008 Pulitzer winner for Drama) : OSAGE
74. “S.N.L.” alum Cheri : OTERI
76. Mimicry : APING
78. July third? : ELL
79. George Burns : SAY GOODNIGHT, GRACIE
83. Genus of small rodents : MUS
86. Items sometimes sniffed at a supermarket : MELONS
87. Highlights : PLAYS UP
88. Mille ___ (part of Québec with a rhyming name) : ILES
90. Fill : SATE
91. Other side : FOE
92. Volleyball venue : BEACH
96. Hair extensions? : RAT-TAILS
98. Something you want to come down from quickly : BAD TRIP
102. Dry: Prefix : XERO-
103. Home of Banff National Park : ALBERTA
104. Animal house : BARN
105. 2004 Chevy debut : AVEO
107. “___ can’t” : NO I
108. Beefeaters, e.g. : GUARDS
109. Red Skelton : AND MAY GOD BLESS
112. Record of the Year Grammy nominee for “Lose Yourself” : EMINEM
113. Primary pigment for printers : MAGENTA
114. Rays’ div. : AL EAST
115. Luna’s counterpart : SELENE
116. Auto steering system components : TIE RODS
117. Potential sweethearts : LASSES

Down
1. Downhill run : SCHUSS
2. Massenet opera based on Greek myth : ARIANE
3. Bears’ home in Texas : BAYLOR
4. 2005 Drama Pulitzer finalist Will : ENO
5. Costner role : NESS
6. Like the origin of the food in many fusion restaurants : ASIAN
7. Pulled apart : RIVEN
8. Compass dir. : ENE
9. Nickname for Huntington Beach, Calif. : SURF CITY
10. Bologna’s place : ITALIA
11. Clinched, with “up” : SEWED
12. “Time ___” (bygone sci-fi series) : TRAX
13. ___-based : SOY
14. Defames : ASPERSES
15. One of the von Trapp girls : MARTA
16. Do some banking, say : AVIATE
17. Going down in the rankings, say : TANKING
18. Holy smoke : INCENSE
19. First Mets manager : STENGEL
24. CNBC news item : LBO
29. Mag proofs : REPROS
31. Shallot, e.g. : BULB
33. Keyes and King : ALANS
34. Mosey along : AMBLE
36. “Beowulf” quaff : MEAD
38. Jesse and Leo of TV sitcoms : UNCLES
41. Poky sorts : SLOTHS
42. Order to go? : SCOOT
43. Onward : FORTH
44. Sees through : IS ONTO
45. Latte option : DECAF
47. Ópera venue : TEATRO
48. Chops up : HASHES
49. S. ___ Merkerson, four-time N.A.A.C.P. Image Award-winning actress : EPATHA
50. Oscar-winning Forest Whitaker role : IDI AMIN
51. Judo gyms : DOJOS
56. Ancient Mexican : TOLTEC
57. Base : ALKALI
58. Company that owns Gerber : NESTLE
60. Layered coifs : SHAGS
62. Groups of strings, maybe : CHORDS
63. Sword fight sounds : CLANGS
65. Letter-shaped bridge support : T-BEAM
66. Mr. Right : THE ONE
67. Dominant : ALPHA
68. Church group : LAITY
74. Black Hills native : OGLALA
75. Sweetie : TOOTS
76. Lace’s end : AGLET
77. Vittles : GRUB
80. Possible answer to “Is that you?” : YES, IT’S ME
81. Apple product : IPOD NANO
82. Extreme point : APEX
83. Sights not to be believed : MIRAGES
84. Poem that ends “This ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir” : ULALUME
85. What a judge might do during a hearing : SET BAIL
89. “A Sentimental Journey” author : STERNE
91. Thomas Jefferson or Jimmy Carter, once : FARMER
93. Virgil hero : AENEAS
94. Bit of field sport equipment : CROSSE
95. Lifts : HOISTS
97. Where to find “books in the running brooks,” per Shakespeare : ARDEN
98. Star, maybe : BADGE
99. Indian melodies : RAGAS
100. Nobelist writer Andric : IVO
101. Go by bike : PEDAL
104. Beginning of some temple names : B’NAI
106. Preceder of “di” or “da” in a Beatles song : OB-LA-
109. Invoice fig. : AMT
110. Since 1/1 : YTD
111. “___ Sylphides” (ballet) : LES

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