0707-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 7 Jul 13, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano
THEME: More at the End … today’s themed answers are L-shaped in the grid, with the tail of the “L” consisting of the letters MORE:

70A. Infomercial line … with a hint to 10 answers in this puzzle : BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!

61A. Sun spot? : BALTIMORE
108A. Minimalist’s philosophy : LESS IS MORE
110A. Dean Martin classic : THAT’S AMORE
1D. President who was not elected : FILLMORE
6D. It’s known for its big busts : MOUNT RUSHMORE
10D. Bauxite, e.g. : ALUMINUM ORE
22D. Second or tenth, in a way : SOPHOMORE
65D. College near Philadelphia : SWARTHMORE
67D. “Go on …” : TELL ME MORE
106D. White rapper with two #1 hits : MACKLEMORE

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 39m 42s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

20. Spanish skating figure : OCHO
A figure skater might carve out a figure eight (“ocho” in Spanish) in the ice.

21. Long rides? : LIMOUSINES
The word “limousine” actually derives from the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a “limousine”. Well, that’s how the story goes anyway …

29. Sgt. Friday’s force : LAPD
“Dragnet” was a very successful police drama that developed into quite a franchise. The show started out on radio in 1949, and then also ran on television from 1952. There were even a couple of movies. Star of the show, and the producer, was Jack Webb who played Sgt. Joe Friday.

Jack Webb played Sergeant Joe Friday on “Dragnet” on both TV and radio … and what a voice he had! Off the screen Webb was a lover of jazz, and he played the cornet. It was within the world of jazz that he met and fell in love with Julie London, the famous singer with “the smoky voice”. The couple married and had two kids together.

30. Philosopher Hannah : ARENDT
Hannah Arendt was studying and working the field of philosophy when she had to flee her native Germany in the runup to WWII because of her Jewish heritage. She ended up in the US in 1941, and took posts in various schools here. In 1969 she was appointed full professor at Princeton, the first woman to win such a position, and a decade before women students were admitted to the college.

40. Prefix with byte : TERA-
The prefix tera- signifies a trillion and comes from the Greek word “teras” meaning “monster”.

In the world of computers, a “bit” is the basic unit of information. A bit has a value of 0 or 1. A “byte” is a small collection of bits (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text.

45. Front part of a chimera : LION
In Greek mythology, a chimera was a female monster with the body of a lioness, a tail that ended in a snake’s head, and the head of a goat that emanated from the lioness’s spine. The term chimera has entered into our modern languag and means a fanciful illusion or fabrication.

52. Spell caster : MAGE
“Mage” is an archaic word for a magician.

53. N.Y.C. tourist attraction : MOMA
The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA’s sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

54. Sign of pressure? : ISOBAR
An isobar is a line on a weather map connecting points of equal barometric pressure.

57. Battle of the ___, 1914 : YSER
The Yser originates in northern France and flows through Belgium into the North Sea. The Yser is often associated with WWI as it figured in a major battle early in the conflict. In the first three months of the war, the German Army pushed almost completely through Belgium, inflicting heavy losses on the Belgian Army as the defenders were forced to fight a fast-moving rearguard action. The Germans were intent on pushing right through Belgium and across France in a “race to the sea”. But the Belgians, with the help of their Allies, decided to make a final stand at the Yser Canal in an effort to prevent the Germans reaching the French ports of Calais and Dunkirk. The 22-mile long defensive line was chosen at the Yser because the river and canal system could be flooded to create a barrier that might be defended. The plan was successful and the front was “stabilized”. As we now know, millions of lives were lost over the coming years with very little movement of that battle line.

61. Sun spot? : BALTIMORE
Maryland’s largest-circulation newspaper is “The Baltimore Sun”. “The Sun” has been around for a long time, founded in 1837.

64. ___ judicata (decided case) : RES
“Res judicata” is a term used in the law for a decided case, which translates from Latin as “a matter already judged”.

66. Tick off : LIST
I might tick off something in a list, but I don’t think I would use the verb “list” to mean “tick off”. But, maybe I am missing something …

68. Grab, with “onto” : GLOM
“Glom” is a slang term meaning “steal”, although it can also be used to mean “latch onto” when used as “glom onto”. The term probably comes from the Scots word “glam” meaning “to snatch at”.

70. Infomercial line … with a hint to 10 answers in this puzzle : BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!
Ron Popeil is an inventor who is well known for appearing in infomercials for his own products. One of the more famous infomercials is for his Showtime Rotisserie, which he touts with the phrase “Set it, and forget it!”. Popeil’s company is called Ronco. Popeil also made popular the phrase “But wait, there’s more!”

75. Where the Confederate flag was first flown: Abbr. : ALA
The first official flag of the Confederacy was known as the Stars and Bars. The flag was designed by a Prussian artist and is similar to the Austrian flag of the day as it contains three bars, two of which are red and one white. The flag includes a blue square containing a ring of stars. Each star represents a state in the Confederacy. The Stars and Bars flag was officially adopted on 4 March 1861 and first flew over the dome of the Capitol Building in Montgomery, Alabama.

77. Cereal box title : CAP’N
The first Cap’n Crunch commercials aired in 1963, at the time the product line was launched. The Cap’n’s full name is Captain Horatio Magellan Crunch, would you believe?. Crunch’s voice was provided for many years by Daws Butler, the same voice actor who gave us Yogi Bear and Huckleberry Hound.

78. It’s a lock : YALE
The Yale brand name comes from the name of the founder of the original company, Linus Yale Jr. Linus Yale was the inventor of the pin tumbler lock.

81. Synthetic fiber : ORLON
Orlon is the brand name used by the DuPont Corporation for the acrylic fibers the company developed in 1941.

83. Provide with cornrows, e.g. : PLAIT
The traditional African American braids known as a cornrows can also be called “crows”, a shortened version of the original term. The style was imported into the US from Africa.

86. Lines on a staff : EGBDF
In the world of music, EGBDF are the notes on the lines of the treble clef. The notes are often remembered with a mnemonic such as “Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge”.

92. 15-Across, in Spanish : TORO
(15A. Zodiac animal : BULL)
In Spanish, the bull (el toro) might be charging at a bullfight.

93. “Love the Way You Lie” rapper : EMINEM
Eminem’s real name is Marshall Mathers, a native of Saint Joseph, Missouri. Mathers grew up poor, raised by a single-mom as the family was abandoned by his father when he was 18 months old. Marshall and his mother moved around the country before settling in a suburb of Detroit. He didn’t do well at school, and dropped out at the age of 17. But in the end he made it pretty big …

95. Snack item that’s round on both ends? : OREO
The Oreo was the best-selling cookie in the 20th century, and almost 500 billion of them have been sold since they were introduced in 1912 by Nabisco. In those early days the creme filling was made with pork fat, but today vegetable oils are used instead. If you take a bite out of an Oreo sold outside of America you might notice a difference from the homegrown cookie, as coconut oil is added in the overseas version to give a different taste.

96. Former Chevy subcompact : AVEO
The Chevrolet Aveo is a subcompact that has been around since 2002. The Aveo is manufactured by GM Daewoo, the GM subsidiary in South Korea. Although the Aveo name is still used in some markets, here in North America the Aveo has been sold as the Chevrolet Sonic since 2012. By the way, GM Daewoo is the third largest manufacturer of automobiles in South Korea, after Hyundai and Kia.

100. What the hyphen in an emoticon often represents : NOSE
An emoticon is a glyph created using text characters to represent facial features, and usually oriented sideways. The emoticon is designed to indicate emotion or attitude. The classic example is the smiley face 🙂

103. John Belushi catchphrase : BUT NO
“But noooo!”

John Belushi was one of the original members of the “Saturday Night Live” cast. On the occasion of Belushi’s 30th birthday in 1979, he had the number one film in the country (“Animal House”), the number one album (“The Blues Brothers: Briefcase of Blues”) and he was a star of the highest-rated late night TV show (“Saturday Night Live”). Belushi died in 1982 from a “speedball”, a combined injection of cocaine and heroin.

107. Diamond wts. : KTS
I know that “karat” is a variant spelling of “carat”, the measure of the purity of gold. I don’t recall seeing “karat” used as a variant of “carat”, the unit of mass used in measuring gemstones. Again, I might have missed something …

110. Dean Martin classic : THAT’S AMORE
“That’s Amore” is a pop standard written by Harry Warren and Jack Brooks in 1952. “That’s Amore” became the signature song for Dean Martin after he sang it (with some help from Jerry Lewis) in the 1953 comedy film “The Caddy”.

113. Asian wild ass : ONAGER
The onager is also known as the Asiatic wild ass. The onager is a little larger than a donkey, and looks like a cross between a donkey and a horse. One characteristic of the onager is that is remarkably “untamable”.

117. Baby ___ : BOOMER
A baby boomer is someone who was born in the post-WWII baby boom. The rate of births had been falling fairly steadily in the US at least since 1900, but this trend was sharply reversed in 1946 after WWII. The higher birth rate continued until 1964, when it returned to pre-war levels. Since then the birth rate has continued to decline, although at a slower pace. The period between 1946 and 1964 is defined as the “baby boom”.

119. Pitching awards : CLIOS
The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

126. Mythical con man : LOKI
Loki is a god appearing in Norse mythology. In one story about Loki, he was punished by other gods for having caused the death of Baldr, the god of light and beauty. Loki was bound to a sharp rock using the entrails of one of his sons. A serpent drips venom which is collected in a bowl, and then Loki’s wife must empty the venom onto her husband when the bowl is full. The venom causes Loki great pain, and his writhing causes the earthquakes that we poor humans have to endure.

127. Neighbor of Somalia : KENYA
Kenya lies on the east coast of Africa, right on the equator. The country takes her name from Mount Kenya, the second highest peak on the continent (after Kilimanjaro).

128. Will-o’-the-wisp feature : APOSTROPHE
The term jack-o’-lantern was originally used as the colloquial name for “ignis fatuus”, or “will-o’-the-wisp”. Ignis fatuus is an eerie light seen at night over bogs and marshes, caused by the spontaneous oxidation (burning) of phosphine and/or methane that emanates from the bog.

129. God wounded by Diomedes in the “Iliad” : ARES
IN Greek mythology, Diomedes was a hero who participated in the Trojan War. In one engagement, the war god Ares descended onto the battlefield to assist the Trojans. With the help of the goddess Athena, Diomedes attacked Ares by throwing his spear and wounding him in the stomach. Area screamed with the voice of 10,000 men and fled the scene.

132. Exiled character in “King Lear” : EDGAR
Edgar is a key figure in William Shakespeare’s tragedy “King Lear”. Edgar is the legitimate son of the Earl of Gloucester, a powerful man in england. Edgar is tricked by his brother, which leads to his exile. Edgar returns in disguise as a mad beggar, and in his disguise is able to help both his father and King Lear himself.

Down
1. President who was not elected : FILLMORE
Vice President Millard Fillmore took over the US Presidency when Zachary Taylor died after only 16 months in office. Fillmore was born in the Finger Lakes region of New York State, but grew up around Buffalo. He was one of the founders of the University of Buffalo and served as chancellor there after he left office in 1853.

3. Snowbird’s vehicle, maybe : MOTORHOME
Snowbirds are people from Canada and the northern US who head south for the winter, to places like Florida and California.

6. It’s known for its big busts : MOUNT RUSHMORE
The four presidents whose faces are carved in the granite face of Mount Rushmore are (from left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. Each of the presidents is about 60 feet in height, although they might have been larger. The original intent was for the presidents to be depicted from head to waist, but the project lost funding.

9. “Freaky Friday” co-star : LOHAN
I think that actress Lindsay Lohan’s big break was in the Disney remake of “The Parent Trap” in 1998. I’ve really only enjoyed one of Lohan’s films though, “Freaky Friday” from 2003 in which she stars alongside the fabulous Jamie Lee Curtis.

10. Bauxite, e.g. : ALUMINUM ORE
Bauxite is an aluminum ore. It takes its name from the absolutely beautiful village of Les Baux in southern France, the home of the geologist who first recognized that the mineral was a useful source of the metal.

14. Skipjacks and others : TUNAS
Skipjack tuna would be called medium-sized, growing to about three feet long. Albacore tuna is a little larger.

16. What’s not yet due? : UNO
“One, two, three” in Italian is “uno, due, tre”.

17. ___ McGarry, chief of staff on “The West Wing” : LEO
In “The West Wing”, Leo McGarry was played very ably by John Spencer. If you haven’t seen them, the early series’ of “The West Wing” are just fabulous. I think I learned so much about the workings of the American government through this TV show.

18. The U.S. banned it in 1968 : LSD
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

22. Second or tenth, in a way : SOPHOMORE
A sophomore is in his or her second year of study in high school, and is in 10th grade.

The term “sophomore” has been used for a student in the second year of university since the 1680’s. The original meaning of the word was “arguer”. The term has Greek roots, from two Greek words that have been artificially combined in English. The Greek “sophos” means “wise”, and “moros” means “foolish”.

33. Oldest desert in the world : NAMIB
The Namib Desert is in Namibia, as one might expect, and and also stretches into part of Angola. It is thought to be the oldest desert in the world, having been arid for over 55 million years.

34. Environmental extremists’ acts : ECOTAGE
“Ecotage” is an act of “sabotage” in the name of environmentalism.

39. Neighbor of Dagwood, in the funnies : ELMO
“Blondie” was created as a comic strip by Chic Young. It was first published in 1930, and is still being created today (although the strip is now controlled by Chic’s son, Dean). The strip spawned a series of radio programs (1939-1950) and a series of Blondie films (1938-1950). Blondie is married to Dagwood Bumstead. Dagwood slaves away at a construction company run by Julius Dithers, whose wife is called Cora. Another famous character in the strip is Elmo Tuttle, a pesky neighborhood kid who is always bugging Dagwood.

41. What the winged woman is holding in the Emmy statuette : ATOM
The Emmy Awards are the television equivalent of the Oscars in the world of film, the Grammy Awards in music and the Tony Awards for the stage. Emmy Awards are presented throughout the year, depending on the sector of television being honored. The most famous of these ceremonies are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards. The distinctive name of “Emmy” is a softened version of the word “immy”, the nickname given to the video camera tubes found in old television cameras.

43. Blog nuisances : TROLLS
In Internet terms, a “troll” is someone who attempts to disrupt online group activities. The fishing term “troll” is used to describe such a person, as he or she throws out off-topic remarks in an attempt to “lure” others into some emotional response.

46. World’s smallest island nation : NAURU
Nauru is the world’s smallest island nation, located in the South Pacific 300 km to the east of Kiribati. The island was taken as a colony by Germany in the late 1800s, and came under the administration of Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom after WWI. The Japanese invaded during WWII, but Nauru was one of the islands that was bypassed in the US advance across the Pacific towards Japan. Nauru achieved independence in 1968.

59. Retailer that sells grasshoppers as food : PETCO
The PETCO logo includes the two company mascots, Red Ruff the dog and Blue Mews the cat.

65. College near Philadelphia : SWARTHMORE
Swarthmore College is a liberal arts school located in the borough of Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, just a few miles southwest of Philadelphia. Originally a Quaker school, Swarthmore has been non-sectarian since the early 1900s.

71. Cool : APLOMB
Aplomb is such a lovely word, meaning confidence and assurance. It is a French word that literally means “perpendicularity”, or “on the plumb line”. The idea is that someone with aplomb is poised, upright, balanced.

76. Where the Code of Hammurabi is displayed : LOUVRE
The Code of Hammurabi is a code of laws that dates back to 1772 BCE, which were enacted by the Babylonian king Hammurabi. . Partial copies of the code have been found on stone steles and clay tablets. The most complete copy of the code can be found on a large stele that is on display in the Louvre Museum in Paris.

88. U.S.S. Ward, e.g. : DESTROYER
The USS Ward was a WWI destroyer that was on patrol off the entrance to Pearl Harbor on the morning of December 7th, 1941. The Ward came across a Japanese midget submarine, attacked it and caused it to sink. This action meant that effectively the USS Ward fired the first American shots of WWII.

104. Siouan speaker : OTO
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

106. White rapper with two #1 hits : MACKLEMORE
Macklemore is the stage name of rap artist Ben Haggerty from Seattle, Washington.

118. Barely manages, with “out” : EKES
To “eke out” means to “make something go further or last longer”. For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses. I always have a problem with the commonly cited definition of “eke out” as “barely get by”. Close but no cigar, I say …

120. Old German duchy name : SAXE
Saxony was the name given at different times in history to states along the Elbe river in central Europe. As the various states broke up, they spawned many duchies that retained the name “Saxe”. The most famous of these duchies was probably Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, two united duchies in Germany that ceased to exist after WWII. A notable branch of the Saxe-Coburg and Gotha House is the British Royal Family, as Queen Victoria was married to Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. King George V of the United Kingdom changed the name of the family to the House of Windsor in a politically sensible move during WWI.

121. Digs : PAD
Back in the 16th century a “pad” was a bundle of straw to lie on, and came to mean a “sleeping place” in the early 1700s. The term was revitalized in the hippie era.

“Digs” is short for “diggings” meaning “lodgings”, but where “diggings” came from, no one seems to know.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Hall-of-___ : FAMER
6. Cry like a baby : MEWL
10. Evolve : ADAPT
15. Zodiac animal : BULL
19. Combined : IN ONE
20. Spanish skating figure : OCHO
21. Long rides? : LIMOUSINES
23. Suddenly smiled broadly : LIT UP
24. “This might get ugly” : UH-OH
25. Like a mischief-maker : UP TO NO GOOD
26. — : LMORE
27. Polite denial : NO MA’AM
29. Sgt. Friday’s force : LAPD
30. Philosopher Hannah : ARENDT
32. It may purr or roar : ENGINE
35. “Zip it!” : SHUT UP!
39. Archaic verb suffix : -ETH
40. Prefix with byte : TERA-
42. Pass : ENACT
44. — : OMORE
45. Front part of a chimera : LION
47. Prankster : CUTUP
50. — : UMORE
52. Spell caster : MAGE
53. N.Y.C. tourist attraction : MOMA
54. Sign of pressure? : ISOBAR
56. Get ___ (fight) : IT ON
57. Battle of the ___, 1914 : YSER
58. Best : ONE-UP
60. — : HMORE
61. Sun spot? : BALTIMORE
63. An extremity : TOE
64. ___ judicata (decided case) : RES
66. Tick off : LIST
68. Grab, with “onto” : GLOM
69. Extremity : END
70. Infomercial line … with a hint to 10 answers in this puzzle : BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!
75. Where the Confederate flag was first flown: Abbr. : ALA
77. Cereal box title : CAP’N
78. It’s a lock : YALE
79. It’s uplifting : BRA
80. Sequel title starter : SON
81. Synthetic fiber : ORLON
83. Provide with cornrows, e.g. : PLAIT
86. Lines on a staff : EGBDF
90. Belted out : SUNG
92. 15-Across, in Spanish : TORO
93. “Love the Way You Lie” rapper : EMINEM
95. Snack item that’s round on both ends? : OREO
96. Former Chevy subcompact : AVEO
97. — : HMORE
99. — : EMORE
100. What the hyphen in an emoticon often represents : NOSE
101. Nonstandard: Abbr. : IRREG
103. John Belushi catchphrase : BUT NO
105. Miner’s aid : TRAM
107. Diamond wts. : KTS
108. Minimalist’s philosophy : LESS IS MORE
110. Dean Martin classic : THAT’S AMORE
113. Asian wild ass : ONAGER
115. Miner’s aid : LAMP
117. Baby ___ : BOOMER
119. Pitching awards : CLIOS
121. Spirited? : PARANORMAL
126. Mythical con man : LOKI
127. Neighbor of Somalia : KENYA
128. Will-o’-the-wisp feature : APOSTROPHE
129. God wounded by Diomedes in the “Iliad” : ARES
130. Glove material : LATEX
131. It’s not good when it’s outstanding : DEBT
132. Exiled character in “King Lear” : EDGAR
133. Recharge, say : REST
134. — : EMORE

Down
1. President who was not elected : FILLMORE
2. Oscar feature subject since 2001 : ANIMATION
3. Snowbird’s vehicle, maybe : MOTORHOME
4. Toughen : ENURE
5. Preacher’s exhortation : REPENT
6. It’s known for its big busts : MOUNT RUSHMORE
7. Repeat word for word : ECHO
8. Words of faux innocence : WHO, ME?
9. “Freaky Friday” co-star : LOHAN
10. Bauxite, e.g. : ALUMINUM ORE
11. Highway caution : DIP
12. Something punched into an A.T.M.: Abbr. : AMT
13. Hotel amenity : POOL
14. Skipjacks and others : TUNAS
15. Chowderhead : BIG DUMMY
16. What’s not yet due? : UNO
17. ___ McGarry, chief of staff on “The West Wing” : LEO
18. The U.S. banned it in 1968 : LSD
22. Second or tenth, in a way : SOPHOMORE
28. Gray : AGE
31. Numerical prefix : DECI-
33. Oldest desert in the world : NAMIB
34. Environmental extremists’ acts : ECOTAGE
36. The “you” of “Here’s to you!” : TOASTEE
37. Cheer for : URGE ON
38. Used a keyhole, in a way : PEERED
39. Neighbor of Dagwood, in the funnies : ELMO
41. What the winged woman is holding in the Emmy statuette : ATOM
43. Blog nuisances : TROLLS
46. World’s smallest island nation : NAURU
48. Fastener with two nuts : U-BOLT
49. Equivalence : PARITY
51. Treat like a pharaoh? : ENTOMB
55. Transform : RESHAPE
59. Retailer that sells grasshoppers as food : PETCO
62. — : IMORE
65. College near Philadelphia : SWARTHMORE
67. “Go on …” : TELL ME MORE
70. Gymnasium decorations : BANNERS
71. Cool : APLOMB
72. Question to a poker player : IN OR OUT?
73. Adjust, as a satellite dish : REAIM
74. Tease : RAG ON
75. Go after : ASSAIL
76. Where the Code of Hammurabi is displayed : LOUVRE
82. What’s up? : NORTH
84. How some N.F.L. games are resolved : IN OT
85. Many an action movie villain : TERRORIST
87. Entered violently : BROKE INTO
88. U.S.S. Ward, e.g. : DESTROYER
89. They’re not on your side : FOES
91. Headlines, as a band : GOES LAST
94. Cussed : MEAN
98. One who doesn’t give tough love, say : ENABLER
102. Legend : GIANT
104. Siouan speaker : OTO
106. White rapper with two #1 hits : MACKLEMORE
109. — : SMORE
111. Sunny? : SOLAR
112. — : AMORE
114. Twinkle : GLEAM
116. Stick on the range? : PROD
118. Barely manages, with “out” : EKES
120. Old German duchy name : SAXE
121. Digs : PAD
122. Parrot : APE
123. Take the wrong way? : ROB
124. Important no. for car buyers : MPG
125. What this puzzle may make you say : AHA

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