0902-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 2 Sep 12, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano
THEME: Pardon Ze Interruption … all of the theme answers are well-known expressions with a “ze” sound inserted somewhere:

23A. Chihuahua that eats only the best dog food? : CHOOSY TOY (from “chew toy”)
25A. What Jennifer Grey does in “Dirty Dancing”? : HOLDS SWAYZE (from “holds sway”)
32A. Promiscuous woman of the Far East? : ASIAN FLOOZIE (from “Asian flu”)
52A. Begin a game of “She loves me, she loves me not …”? : SEIZE THE DAISY (from “seize the day”)
70A. First-class piece of infant’s wear? : CAPITAL ONESIE (from “Capital One”)
83A. Everest? : MOUNTAIN DOOZY (from “Mountain Dew”)
106A. Where busybodies live? : NOSY MAN’S LAND (from “no man’s land”)
117A. Group that regularly plays a classic dice game? : YAHTZEE CLUB (from “yacht club”)
119A. Drop a hip-hop star from the festival lineup? : SCRUB JAY-Z (from “scrub jay”)

COMPLETION TIME: 34m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 3 … ROUT (riot), IOLANA (I’ILANI), AUGHTS (aoghts!)


Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. “Iliad” character : AJAX
As described in Homer’s “Iliad”, Hector was a Trojan prince and a great fighter. During the war with the Greeks, in order avoid a bloody battle, Hector challenged any one of the Greek warriors to a duel. Ajax was chosen by the Greeks, and the two fought for an entire day before they declared a stalemate.

The Iliad is the epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war.

5. Cracked a bit : AJAR
Our word “ajar” is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which “a char” means “slightly open”.

9. 1986 U.S.S.R. launch : MIR
Mir was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001.

12. Comedian who was the only man on Maxim’s 2012 Hot 100 list of most beautiful women : COLBERT
Stephen Colbert is a political satirist who hosts his own show on Comedy Central, “The Colbert Report”. Colbert’s first love was theater, and so he studied to become an actor. He then moved into comedy, and ended up on the “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart”. He left “The Daily Show” in 2005 to set up his own spin-off, “The Colbert Report”. In his own inimitable way, Colbert likes to use a “French” pronunciation for the name of his show, so “The Colbert Report” comes out as “The Col-bear Rep-oar”.

19. 2004 Best Actor winner for “Ray” : FOXX
Jamie Foxx is the professional name used by Eric Marlon Bishop, an actor from Terrell, Texas. Foxx’s most acclaimed performance in film was the title role in “Ray”, the biopic about Ray Charles.

Ray Charles came up with his stage name by dropping the family name from his real moniker, Ray Charles Robinson. Ray’s life was a wild ride, well represented in the excellent biopic called “Ray” released in 2004 and starring Jamie Foxx in the title role. Ray was married twice and fathered 12 children with nine different women. As I said, a wild ride …

20. Sir Galahad, e.g. : HERO
Sir Galahad is one of the Knights of the Round Table of Arthurian legend. Galahad is the illegitimate son of Sir Lancelot, so appears a little later in the tales. He is very gallant and noble, and some see him as the embodiment of Jesus in the Arthurian tradition. Indeed, legend has it that his soul was brought to heaven by Joseph of Arimathea, the man who donated his own tomb for the burial of Jesus according to the Gospels.

21. Foofaraw : ADO
Foofaraw is excessive or flashy ornamentation, or a fuss over something that is unimportant.

22. Rhododendron relatives : AZALEAS
Azaleas are very toxic to horses, sheep and goats, but strangely enough cause no problem for cats or dogs. And if you go to Korea you might come across “Tugyonju”, which is azalea wine made from the plant’s blossoms.

23. Chihuahua that eats only the best dog food? : CHOOSY TOY (from “chew toy”)
Chihuahua is a state in northern Mexico that shares a border with Texas and New Mexico. Chihuahua is the largest state in the country, so has the nickname “El Estado Grande”. The state takes its name from the Chihuahuan Desert which lies largely within its borders. And of course the Chihuahua breed of dog takes its name from the state.

25. What Jennifer Grey does in “Dirty Dancing”? : HOLDS SWAYZE (from “holds sway”)
I think Patrick Swayze’s greatest role was the dance instructor in the 1987 movie “Dirty Dancing”. Swayze (and Jennifer Grey who played opposite Swayze) were chosen for the starring roles because of their dancing ability. Swayze had a fair amount of acting experience, and his dancing experience was with the Joffrey Ballet. Sadly, Swayze passed away at age 57 in 2009, from pancreatic cancer.

29. Book of legends : ATLAS
An atlas contains many maps, and legends that help interpret those maps.

30. ___-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 : SMOOT
The Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 was sponsored by US Senator Reed Smoot and US Representative Willis C. Hawley. The act raised tariffs on imported goods to record levels, the second highest in US history. The strategy appeared to work at first, protecting US jobs in the early days of the depression. But, as many anticipated, tariffs were raised in retaliation by other countries and US exports plummeted. Many economists blame the 1930 Tariff Act for the depth of the Great Depression.

31. 2012, por ejemplo : ANO
“Por ejemplo” is Spanish for “for example”.

In Spanish, a year (año) starts in January (Enero) and ends in December (Diciembre).

32. Promiscuous woman of the Far East? : ASIAN FLOOZIE (from “Asian flu”)
The so called “Asian Flu” was a pandemic that originated in China in 1956, and lasted until 1958. The virus killed an estimated 2 million people worldwide, including almost 70,000 in the US.

51. Fey of “30 Rock” : TINA
I was shocked to read that Tina Fey has a scar on her face, a few inches long on her left cheek, the result of a childhood “slashing” incident. When she was just five years old, playing in the front yard of her house, someone just came up to her and slashed her with a knife. How despicable!

52. Begin a game of “She loves me, she loves me not …”? : SEIZE THE DAISY (from “seize the day”)
“Carpe diem” is a quotation from Horace, one of Ancient Rome’s leading lyric poets. “Carpe diem” translates from Latin as “seize the day” or “enjoy the day”.

63. Prefix with sexual : METRO-
I think it’s generally accepted that the term “metrosexual”, from “metropolitan heterosexual”, is a man who lives in an urban environment and puts a fair amount of money and energy into his appearance. That wouldn’t be me, then …

64. Diploma word : SUMMA
When an academic degree is awarded, a level of distinction can be noted depending on the degree of success achieved by the student. There are three types of honors, each with a Latin name:

– cum laude: meaning “with honor” (literally “with praise”)
– magna cum laude: meaning “with great honor”
– summa cum laude: meaning “with highest honor”

65. “The Addams Family” matriarch : MORTICIA
Gomez and Morticia Addams were the parents in “The Addams Family”, a creation of the cartoonist Charles Addams. In the sixties television show, Gomez was played by John Astin and Morticia was played by Carolyn Jones.

82. Northern force : MOUNTIES
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the Mounties; RCMP) is an unusual police force in that it provides all policing for the whole country. It works on the national level, right down to the municipal level. The distinctive RCMP uniform of red serge tunic, blue pants with a yellow stripe, stetson hat etc. is known internally as “Review Order”. The red uniform dates back to the days of the North-West Mounted Police, forerunners to the mounties that were formed in 1920 through the merger of existing forces.

83. Everest? : MOUNTAIN DOOZY (from “Mountain Dew”)
If you check the can, you’ll see that “Mountain Dew” is now known as “Mtn Dew”.

87. ___ Aviv : TEL
The full name of Israel’s second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. Tel Aviv translates into “Spring Mound”, a name chosen in 1910.

88. Nietzsche’s “never” : NIE
Friedrich Nietzsche was a German philosopher. Not my cup of tea …

89. Pentathlete, at times : EPEEIST
The original pentathlon of the ancient Olympic games consisted of a foot race, wrestling, long jump, javelin and discus. When a new pentathlon was created as a sport for the modern Olympic Games, it was given the name the “modern pentathlon”. First introduced in 1912, the modern pentathlon consists of:

– pistol shooting
– épée fencing
– 200m freestyle swimming
– show jumping
– 3 km cross-country running

93. MI6 : Britain :: ___ : U.S. : CIA
The UK government gets its foreign intelligence through the Secret Intelligence Service, better known as MI6. The moniker MI6 arose during WWII, and stands for Military Intelligence, Section 6. MI5 is the common name for the UK’s Security Service, the UK’s counter-intelligence and security agency.

96. Rhythm band instrument : MARACA
Maracas are percussion instruments native to Latin America. Maracas are constructed from a dried shell, like that of a coconut, to which a handle is attached. The shell is filled with dried seeds or beans, and shaken.

112. Tank top? : ALGAE
There may be some algae floating at the top of a tank of water.

115. Midwest native : OTOE
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

116. At birth : NEE
“Née” is the French word for “born”, when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”.

117. Group that regularly plays a classic dice game? : YAHTZEE CLUB (from “yacht club”)
The dice game of Yahtzee was introduced in 1956, a variant of earlier dice games, especially the game “Yacht” (which even has a similar name). Yahtzee is required playing in our house at holidays.

119. Drop a hip-hop star from the festival lineup? : SCRUB JAY-Z (from “scrub jay”)
Jay-Z, as well as being a successful and very rich rap artist, is married to singer Beyonce.

The scrub jay is a blue and gray bird that is mainly found in Florida.

121. Lake at one end of the Welland Canal : ONTARIO
The Welland Canal is a part of the St. Lawrence Seaway and is a canal that allows ships to bypass Niagara Falls (which is pretty much a necessity!).

122. “Small Craft on a Milk Sea” musician : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, his most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft’s “start-up jingle”, the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up.

124. Pulitzer-winning James : AGEE
James Agee was a noted American film critic. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously.

125. Pathfinders, e.g. : NISSANS
The Nissan Pathfinder is an SUV, sold in Japan and the rest of the world as the Nissan Terrano.

127. Ad Council output, for short : PSAS
Public service announcement (PSA).

Down
2. Cochran who defended O. J. : JOHNNIE
Johnnie Cochran was the lawyer who led the successful defense team for O. J. Simpson when Simpson was accused of murdering his ex-wife and her friend Ronald Goldman.

3. Mexican salamander : AXOLOTL
An axoloti is a salamander that is native to Central Mexico. The name “axolotl” translates as “water monster”, and an ugly little creature it is too …

4. Losing tic-tac-toe line : XXO
When I was growing up in Ireland, we played “noughts and crosses” … our name for tic-tac-toe.

6. “Kiss of the Dragon” star : JET LI
The actor Jet Li’s real name is Li Jian Jie. Jet Li is a martial artist and international film star from Beijing, China. He played a villain in “Lethal Weapon 4”, and had a leading role in the 2000 movie “Romeo Must Die”.

8. Booker Prize winner Arundhati ___ : ROY
Arundhati Roy is an Indian author best-known for her novel “The God of Small Things” published in 1997.

9. Taj ___ : MAHAL
The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the third wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple’s 14th child!

12. He said “My reputation, Iago, my reputation!” : CASSIO
Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. Iago is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. He hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdomona, Othello’s wife. By the end of the play it’s Iago himself who is discredited and Othello (before committing suicide) apologizes to Cassio for having believed Iago’s lies. Heavy stuff …

16. “It’s not much of a tail, but I’m sort of attached to it” speaker : EEYORE
Eeyore is the donkey character in A. A. Milne’s “Winnie-the-Pooh”.

A. A. Milne’s “Winnie-the-Pooh” has been translated into many languages, and is one of the few modern titles for which there is a Latin version. Alexander Lenard had “Winnie ille Pu” published in 1958, and two years later it made it to the New York Times Best Seller List, the only book in the Latin language ever to get that honor.

18. African danger : TSETSE
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name “tsetse” comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as “fly”. Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as “sleeping sickness”. The disease is caused by a parasite which is passed on to humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the tsetse fly, then it is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

35. 1930s world chess champion Max : EUWE
Max Euwe was a Dutch chess grandmaster and a mathematician. Euwe became the fifth World Chess Champion, in 1935.

41. “Bill & ___ Excellent Adventure” : TEDS
“Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” is a 1989 comedy sci-fi film, starring Alex Winter as Bill and Keanu Reeves as Ted.

44. Palindromic auto model : CIVIC
Introduced in 1972, the Honda Civic is the second-oldest brand of Japanese car made for the US today (only the Toyota Corolla has been around longer). Today’s Civic is a compact car, but the original was smaller, and classed as a sub-compact. The first design had a transverse-mounted engine and front-wheel drive to save on space, copying the configuration introduced with the British Mini.

50. Torque symbols : TAUS
Torque can be thought of as a turning force, say the force needed to tighten a bolt or a nut.

54. Ian Fleming’s alma mater : ETON
The world-famous Eton College is just a brisk walk from Windsor Castle, which itself is just outside London. Eton is noted for producing many British leaders including David Cameron who took power in the last UK general election. The list of Old Etonians also includes Princes William and Harry, the Duke of Wellington, George Orwell, and the creator of James Bond, Ian Fleming (as well as 007 himself as described in the Fleming novels).

58. Gooey treats : S’MORES
S’mores are a treat peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s’more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called “Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts”. Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

59. “Revolutionary Road” novelist Richard : YATES
Richard Yates was a novelist and short story writer from Yonkers, New York. The most famous of his works was “Revolutionary Road”, the first novel Yates published, in 1962.

61. 1974 hit with a Spanish title : ERES TU
We have a big event across Europe every year called the Eurovision Song Contest. Each nation enters one song in competition with each other, and then voters across the whole continent decide on the winner. That’s how ABBA got their big break when they won in 1974 with “Waterloo”. In 1972, Spain’s entry was “Eres tu” (the Spanish for “You Are”) sung by the band Mocedades. “Eres tu” came second in the competition, but should have won in my humble opinion.

65. It may have a blinking light : MODEM
A modem is a device that is used to facilitate the transmission of a digital signal over an analog line. At one end of the line a modem is used to “modulate” an analog carrier signal to encode the the digital information, and at the other end a modem is used to “demodulate” the analog carrier signal and so reproduce the original digital information. This modulation-demodulation gives the device its name: a MOdulator-DEModulator, or “modem”.

72. First name in cosmetics : ESTEE
Estée Lauder was quite the successful business woman, with a reputation as a great salesperson. She introduced her own line of fragrances starting in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bath water. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths, while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

75. “The Metaphysics of Morals” author : KANT
Immanuel Kant was an 18th-century, German philosopher. Kant published “Perpetual Peace” in 1795, laying out what he believed were conditions for ending all wars and creating a lasting peace. The good news for us is that one of these conditions was to have a world full of constitutional republics, so it seems we are on the right track here in the US!

80. Musical note part : STEM
In musical notation, a note is made up of the note head connected to the straight line called the stem, and perhaps a flag(s) at the opposite end of the stem to the notehead.

82. Powers player : MYERS
The character of Austin Powers was created by the actor who plays him, Mike Myers. Apparently Myers came up with the idea for Powers while listening to the Burt Bacharach song “The Look of Love”.

84. Moore who wrote “Watchmen” : ALAN
Alan Moore is an English writer of graphic novels, a term that Moore himself introduced in order to differentiate his work from “comic books”.

85. National park through which the Virgin River runs : ZION
To me, the most spectacular feature of Zion National Park, in southwestern Utah, is the magnificent Zion Canyon. The canyon cuts through red Navajo sandstone and is a truly beautiful sight.

90. It started around 1100 B.C. : IRON AGE
Ancient societies can be classified by the “three-age system”, which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:

– The Stone Age
– The Iron Age
– The Bronze Age

The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

91. 1979 #1 hit for Robert John : SAD EYES
Robert John is a singer-songwriter from Brooklyn, New York. John’s biggest hit was “Sad Eyes” from 1979.

94. Honolulu’s ___ Palace : ‘IOLANI
The ‘Iolani Palace in downtown Honolulu is unique within this country. It is the only royal palace in the US that was used as an official residence by a reigning monarch. The Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown in 1893 so the palace was used by successive governments even after Hawaii was awarded statehood in 1959. The palace has been a public museum since 1978.

95. Period of George W. Bush’s presidency : AUGHTS
The “aughts” are the years 2000-2009. I’ve also heard those years referred to as “the noughties”.

97. Events for those who know the ropes? : RODEOS
“Rodeo” is a Spanish word, which is usually translated as “round up”.

105. Cheerios : TA-TAS
An Englishman might say “ta-ta” or “cheerio” instead of “goodbye”. Well, supposedly so!

107. ___ Day : ARBOR
Arbor Day is a holiday each year in which people traditionally plant and care for trees. The first Arbor Day was held way back in 1872.

108. Fancy hotel features : ATRIA
In modern architecture an atrium is a large open space, often in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

110. Ball girl : DEB
Deb is short for “debutante”, translating from French as “female beginner”.

113. Book before Nehemiah : EZRA
In the Hebrew Bible the Book of Ezra was originally combined with the Book of Nehemiah, with the two being separated in the early days of the Christian Era.

118. Essen article : EIN
I knew a man back in Ireland, a German national from the city of Essen. He had very sad tales to tell from the days of WWII. As a young boy he lost his (socialist) parents during the Nazi purges early in the war. In 1943 he was living with his grandmother and still attending school when he was drafted into the army along with the rest of his class (at 14 years of age). His platoon leader was his school teacher who made a point of tutoring the boys in place of military drilling. One day he was on guard duty with his class/platoon at the dam above the city, and along come the Dam Busters with their bouncing bombs. The raid was successful (from the perspective of the Allies), but he described terrible famine faced by the people below the dam due to flooding of the farmland that surrounded the factories.

120. Basketball highlight, slangily : JAM
Apparently a “jam” in baseball is an inside pitch to a batter.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “Iliad” character : AJAX
5. Cracked a bit : AJAR
9. 1986 U.S.S.R. launch : MIR
12. Comedian who was the only man on Maxim’s 2012 Hot 100 list of most beautiful women : COLBERT
19. 2004 Best Actor winner for “Ray” : FOXX
20. Sir Galahad, e.g. : HERO
21. Foofaraw : ADO
22. Rhododendron relatives : AZALEAS
23. Chihuahua that eats only the best dog food? : CHOOSY TOY (from “chew toy”)
25. What Jennifer Grey does in “Dirty Dancing”? : HOLDS SWAYZE (from “holds sway”)
27. Photo blowup: Abbr. : ENL
28. Position of authority : HELM
29. Book of legends : ATLAS
30. ___-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 : SMOOT
31. 2012, por ejemplo : ANO
32. Promiscuous woman of the Far East? : ASIAN FLOOZIE (from “Asian flu”)
36. Lets a ground ball go through one’s legs, say : ERRS
37. Opposite of rises : SITS
39. Multitude : SEA
40. Announcement early in an inning, maybe : ONE OUT
42. Suffix with legal : -ESE
43. Sprint’s business : TELECOM
47. Part of w.p.m.: Abbr. : WDS
49. Like some kisses : WET
51. Fey of “30 Rock” : TINA
52. Begin a game of “She loves me, she loves me not …”? : SEIZE THE DAISY (from “seize the day”)
60. Blissful : HEAVENLY
63. Prefix with sexual : METRO-
64. Diploma word : SUMMA
65. “The Addams Family” matriarch : MORTICIA
66. Salad bar bowlful : SPROUTS
68. Mark : SPOT
69. Unveil, in poems : OPE
70. First-class piece of infant’s wear? : CAPITAL ONESIE (from “Capital One”)
73. Word often shortened to one letter in text messages : ARE
74. Anchor’s place : DESK
76. Two-day trips, sometimes : RED-EYES
77. Bargain hunters’ destinations : TAG SALES
79. Form of Spanish “to be” : ESTAS
81. Verb for thou : DOEST
82. Northern force : MOUNTIES
83. Everest? : MOUNTAIN DOOZY (from “Mountain Dew”)
86. Like many a forgetful actor : CUED
87. ___ Aviv : TEL
88. Nietzsche’s “never” : NIE
89. Pentathlete, at times : EPEEIST
93. MI6 : Britain :: ___ : U.S. : CIA
96. Rhythm band instrument : MARACA
101. Scepter go-with : ORB
103. Start of a tournament … or the end of a match? : DRAW
104. “Laugher” : ROUT
106. Where busybodies live? : NOSY MAN’S LAND (from “no man’s land”)
111. Poetic praise : ODE
112. Tank top? : ALGAE
114. Ambience factor : DECOR
115. Midwest native : OTOE
116. At birth : NEE
117. Group that regularly plays a classic dice game? : YAHTZEE CLUB (from “yacht club”)
119. Drop a hip-hop star from the festival lineup? : SCRUB JAY-Z (from “scrub jay”)
121. Lake at one end of the Welland Canal : ONTARIO
122. “Small Craft on a Milk Sea” musician : ENO
123. Related : AKIN
124. Pulitzer-winning James : AGEE
125. Pathfinders, e.g. : NISSANS
126. Orch. section : STR
127. Ad Council output, for short : PSAS
128. Child’s room, often : MESS

Down
1. Patriots’ group : AFC EAST
2. Cochran who defended O. J. : JOHNNIE
3. Mexican salamander : AXOLOTL
4. Losing tic-tac-toe line : XXO
5. “Now I see” : AH YES
6. “Kiss of the Dragon” star : JET LI
7. They might make your mouth water : AROMAS
8. Booker Prize winner Arundhati ___ : ROY
9. Taj ___ : MAHAL
10. “Likewise” : I DO TOO
11. Spray alternative : ROLL-ON
12. He said “My reputation, Iago, my reputation!” : CASSIO
13. Soda bottle meas. : OZS
14. House work? : LAWS
15. Scapegoat’s onus : BLAME
16. “It’s not much of a tail, but I’m sort of attached to it” speaker : EEYORE
17. Shower items, maybe : RAZORS
18. African danger : TSETSE
24. Doo-wop syllable : SHA
26. Flabbergast : DAZE
33. Informative : NEWSY
34. Scene-ending film technique : FADE
35. 1930s world chess champion Max : EUWE
38. Attack : SET AT
41. “Bill & ___ Excellent Adventure” : TEDS
44. Palindromic auto model : CIVIC
45. Like some garages : ONE-CAR
46. Salon treatment, informally : MANI-PEDI
48. Fool : SIMPLETON
50. Torque symbols : TAUS
53. Losers : ZEROS
54. Ian Fleming’s alma mater : ETON
55. Not cheating on : TRUE TO
56. Burrito topper : HOT SAUCE
57. Spear : IMPALE
58. Gooey treats : S’MORES
59. “Revolutionary Road” novelist Richard : YATES
60. “God willing” : HOPE SO
61. 1974 hit with a Spanish title : ERES TU
62. Applied, as paint : LAID ON
65. It may have a blinking light : MODEM
66. Authority : SAY-SO
67. Register : SIGN UP
71. Ticked (off) : TEED
72. First name in cosmetics : ESTEE
75. “The Metaphysics of Morals” author : KANT
78. Gave a leg up : AIDED
80. Musical note part : STEM
82. Powers player : MYERS
84. Moore who wrote “Watchmen” : ALAN
85. National park through which the Virgin River runs : ZION
90. It started around 1100 B.C. : IRON AGE
91. 1979 #1 hit for Robert John : SAD EYES
92. Plucks : TWEEZES
93. Wax cylinder : CRAYON
94. Honolulu’s ___ Palace : ‘IOLANI
95. Period of George W. Bush’s presidency : AUGHTS
97. Events for those who know the ropes? : RODEOS
98. “Hang on ___” : A SEC
99. Rinse and dry : CYCLES
100. Come (to) : AMOUNT
102. Town squares? : BLOCKS
105. Cheerios : TA-TAS
107. ___ Day : ARBOR
108. Fancy hotel features : ATRIA
109. Rock and roll, e.g. : NOUNS
110. Ball girl : DEB
113. Book before Nehemiah : EZRA
118. Essen article : EIN
119. Fool : SAP
120. Basketball highlight, slangily : JAM

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