0826-12: New York times Crossword Answers 26 Aug 12, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Amanda Yesnowitz & Doug Peterson,
THEME: Put a Lid in It … this is a rebus puzzle, with the word HAT appearing in six squares:

25A. Banned book of 1928 : LADY C(HAT)TERLEY’S LOVER
43A. Source material for Broadway’s “Seussical” : HORTON (HAT)CHES THE EGG
59A. Time’s 1930 Man of the Year : MA(HAT)MA GANDHI
74A. 1955 Grant/Kelly thriller : TO CATC(H A T)HIEF
88A. World’s first certified gold record, 1942 : C(HAT)TANOOGA CHOO CHOO
107A. Source of the line “They say miracles are past” : ALL’S WELL T(HAT) ENDS WELL
18D. Nirvana achievers : AR(HAT)S
45D. 1962 John Wayne film : (HAT)ARI
53D. Talking doll that debuted in 1960 : C(HAT)TY CATHY
71D. Mock response to a friend who pulls a practical joke : I(HAT)E YOU
84D. Hut cover : T(HAT)CH
110D. Storage item … or one of six in this puzzle? : (HAT)BOX

COMPLETION TIME: 26m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … LYNX (Lenx!), SLATY (slate)


Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Norah Jones or Cher : ALTO
The beguiling Norah Jones is the daughter of famous sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar, and is one of my favorite singers. If you haven’t heard Jones sing “Come Away with Me”, you just haven’t lived …

Cher’s real name is Cherilyn Sarkasian, born in 1946. In her acting career Cher was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar of 1984 for her performance in “Silkwood”. She went further in 1998 and won the Best Actress Oscar for playing Loretta Castorini in “Moonstruck”.

19. Big employer in Moline, Ill. : DEERE
John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere’s invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of “stickiness”.

23. Storied C.S.A. commander : R E LEE
Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited him to take command of the whole Union Army but Lee declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

24. Onetime Ethiopia colonizers : ITALIANS
Ethiopia holds an important position within the nations of Africa, with the capital of Addis Ababa being home to many international organizations that are focused on the continent.

25. Banned book of 1928 : LADY C(HAT)TERLEY’S LOVER
“Lady Chatterley’s Lover” is perhaps the most famous novel by the English author D. H. Lawrence. The novel is renowned for its explicit description of sexual encounters and its use of strong language. “Lady Chatterley’s Lover” was first published in 1928, but so “edgy” was the content that the first unexpurgated edition wasn’t published in the UK until 1960.

28. “___ Baby” (song from “Hair”) : ABIE
The full name of the famed stage show from the sixties is “Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical”. This controversial work outraged many when it was first performed in the sixties as it attacked many aspects of life at the time. For example, the song “Air” is a satirical look at pollution, sung by a character who comes onto the stage wearing a gas mask. The opening lines are “Welcome, sulfur dioxide. Hello carbon monoxide. The air … is everywhere”. I’ve never had the chance to see “Hair” in a live production, but it’s on “the bucket list” …

29. Group that’s got your no.? : SSA
The Social Security Administration (SSA) was of course set up as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. The first person to receive a monthly retirement benefit was Ida May Fuller of Vermont who received her first check for the sum of $22.54 after having contributed for three years through payroll taxes. The New Deal turned out to be a good deal for Ms. Fuller, as she lived to 100 years of age and received a total benefit of almost $23,000, whereas her three years of contributions added up to just $24.75.

30. Hawaiian priest : KAHUNA
Like many words in Hawaiian, the term “kahuna” has many translations, everything from a priest to an expert in some profession. The expression “the Big Kahuna” comes from the movie “Gidget”, released in 1959. The Big Kahuna was the leader of one of the surfing gangs in the film, and was played by Cliff Robertson.

36. Bad way to run : AMOK
The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy …

42. Mag. wheels : EDS
Editors are “big wheels” in magazine publishing.

43. Source material for Broadway’s “Seussical” : HORTON (HAT)CHES THE EGG
Horton the elephant turns up in two books by Dr. Seuss, “Horton Hatches the Egg” and “Horton Hears a Who!”

“Seussical” is a Broadway musical that was first staged in 2000. “Seussical” uses many of the Dr. Seuss books as source material, and is a popular production in regional theaters.

49. Oscar-winning role for Cotillard : PIAF
“La Môme Piaf” (the little sparrow) was the nickname of France’s most famous singer, Édith Piaf. What a voice this woman had, and what gorgeous ballads she sang. 
Édith Piaf lived a life that was not without controversy. She was raised by her mother in a brothel in Normandy, and had a pimp as a boyfriend in her teens. She had one child, while very young, born illegitimately and who died at 2-years-old from meningitis. Her singing career started when she was discovered in the Pigalle area of Paris by nightclub owner Louis Leplée. Leplée was murdered soon after, and Piaf was accused of being an accessory to the murder but was later acquitted. During World War II she was branded a traitor by many as she frequently performed for the German occupying forces, although there are other reports of her supporting the resistance movement. Later in her life she was seriously injured in no less than three, near-fatal car accidents, including one with her friend, Charles Aznavour. While recovering from her injuries she became addicted to pain medication, an addiction that lasted for the rest of her life. When she died in 1963 she was denied a Catholic funeral mass because of her lifestyle, but the crowds that turned out for her funeral procession managed to stop all traffic in Paris, the only time that has happened since the end of WWII.

Marion Cotillard is the French actress who played Édith Piaf in the 2007 movie “La Vie en Rose”. Cotillard won the Best Actress Oscar for her performance, marking the first time that an actress has won a Best Actress Academy Award for a performance in a French language film.

50. “Anne of Green Gables” town : AVONLEA
When Lucy Maud Montgomery wrote her classic novel “Anne of Green Gables”, she created the fictional community of Avonlea on Prince Edward Island as the setting for her story.

54. Paradoxical one : ZENO
Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his “paradoxes”, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as Achilles and the Tortoise, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival, or can he …?

56. Seaman’s swig : GROG
Edward Vernon was a naval officer with the nickname “Old Grog”. In 1740, Vernon ordered that the daily ration of rum for his sailors should be watered down, in order to reduce discipline problems caused by drunkenness. The diluted rum was sweetened with sugar, and lemon or lime added to help preserve it on long voyages. This recipe, found to reduce scurvy among sailors (because of the citrus) spread throughout the Royal Navy, and “grog” was born.

59. Time’s 1930 Man of the Year : MA(HAT)MA GANDHI
Mohandas Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader in India in the first part of the 20th century, as the country sought independence from Britain. Gandhi was also referred to as “Mahatma”, meaning “great soul”. His remarkable philosophy of nonviolence and living a modest lifestyle was a great inspiration to the Indian people. India (and Pakistan) was granted independence in 1947. Sadly, Gandhi was assassinated the very next year, by a Hindu nationalist.

62. Slap-happy sort? : MOE
If you’ve seen a few of the films starring “The Three Stooges” you’ll have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as “Moe, Larry and Shemp”. Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, “Moe, Larry And Curly”. Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then “Curly-Joe” DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

64. Razor handle? : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

67. Japanese model : ALTIMA
Nissan has been making the Altima since 1993. In 2007 the company started to produce a hybrid version, Nissan’s first foray into the hybrid market and a successful one by all accounts. Altima hybrids are even used as police cruisers by the New York Police Department.

68. Bad service result? : LET
A bad service in tennis might result in a “let”.

70. Kind of heart valve : MITRAL
The mitral valve lies between the left atrium and left ventricle in the heart.

72. English author Elinor : GLYN
Elinor Glyn was an English writer of romantic fiction for women. It was Glyn who introduced the world to the “it girl”, a young woman possessing the quality of absolute attraction.

74. 1955 Grant/Kelly thriller : TO CATC(H A T)HIEF
“To Catch a Thief” is one of my favorite movies, a Hitchcock classic starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly. The film is based on a novel of the same name (which I really must read, now that I know about it) written by David F. Dodge.

82. Smokey the Bear spot, e.g., in brief : PSA
Public service announcement (PSA).

Smokey Bear (and not Smokey “the” Bear, as mentioned in the clue) is the mascot of the US Forest Service. Smokey first appeared in 1944, in an advertising campaign directed towards preventing forest fires.

88. World’s first certified gold record, 1942 : C(HAT)TANOOGA CHOO CHOO
“Chattanooga Choo Choo” is a song from the film “Sun Valley Serenade” released in 1941. The song was recorded by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra that same year, and was destined to become the first record to sell over a million copies and become certified “gold”.

96. Reactor safety org. : NRC
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) oversees most aspects of the safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel in the US.

98. Bolt from Jamaica : USAIN
Usain Bolt is a Jamaican sprinter who won the 100m and 200m race gold medals in both the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games. Back in Jamaica, Bolt was really into cricket and probably would have been a very successful fast bowler had he not hit the track instead.

101. Ecologists’ study : BIOMES
I tend to think of “biome” is another word for an ecosystem.

104. Kanga’s offspring : ROO
Kanga is a friend of Winnie-the-Pooh, and is a kangaroo. She is the mother of Roo, who appears more frequently in the storyline.

106. Fort Sill’s home: Abbr. : OKLA
Fort Sill was built as a US Army installation in 1869 during the Indian Wars, and it is still operating today. Fort Sill is located in Lawton, Oklahoma and is home to the Army’s Field Artillery School.

107. Source of the line “They say miracles are past” : ALL’S WELL T(HAT) ENDS WELL
“All’s Well That Ends Well” is a play by William Shakespeare, one with elements of both tragedy and comedy.

112. “Sing a Song of Watergate” comic : MORT SAHL
Mort Sahl is a Canadian-born actor and comedian who moved to the US with his family when he was a child. He became friends with John F. Kennedy and later when Kennedy became president, Sahl wrote a lot of jokes for the President’s speeches, although he also told a lot of Kennedy jokes in his acts. After the President was assassinated in 1963, Sahl was intensely interested in finding out who was behind the crime and even got himself deputized as a member of one of the investigating teams. He was very outspoken against the results of the Warren Commission report on the assassination, and soon found himself out of favor with the public. It took a few years for him to make his comeback, but comeback he did.

115. Former General Motors vehicles : SAABS
SAAB stands for Svenska Aeroplan AB, which translates into English as Swedish Aeroplane Limited. SAAB was, and still is, mainly an aircraft manufacturer. If you take small hops in Europe you might find yourself on a SAAB passenger plane. The SAAB automobile division was acquired by General Motors in the year 2000.

117. Where to park a parka? : COAT TREE
A parka is a hooded, often fur jacket that is worn in cold weather. The original parka was a pullover design, but nowadays it is usually zipped at the front. “Parka” is the Russian name for the garment , absorbed into English in the late 1700s via the Aleut language.

121. Announcer Hall : EDD
Edd Hall is most famous as the former announcer for Jay Leno on “The Tonight Show”.

122. Former Mercury : LYNX
At one point, the Lynx was the best-selling car made under the Mercury name. The Lynx was in effect a Ford Escort with a different badge.

Down
5. “South Park” boy : ERIC
Eric Cartman is a character on the animated television series “South Park”, a show that I have never watched …

8. Place to find a crawdad : CREEK
“Crawdad” is another name for the crayfish, with “crawdad” being more common in the south of the country.

12. Shout to a diva : BRAVA
“Diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean goddess or fine lady, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

13. “The Kite Runner” protagonist : AMIR
“The Kite Runner” is the first novel by Khaled Hosseini, published in 2003. The very successful book became an equally successful film released in 2007. “The Kite Runner” tells the story of a young boy called Amir growing up in Kabul, Afghanistan.

14. Mauna ___ : LOA
Mauna Loa on the “big island” of Hawaii is the largest volcano on the planet (in terms of volume). The name “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain”.

15. Spike, once : TNN
The Nashville Network (TNN) was a country music cable channel that operated from 1983 to 2003. When TNN closed down it was relaunched with a completely different format as Spike, marketed as “the first television channel for men”.

18. Nirvana achievers : AR(HAT)S
“Arhat” is a Sanskrit word, the exact translation of which is somewhat disputed, with the various Buddhist traditions assuming different meanings. Translations vary from “worthy one” to “vanquisher of enemies”.

Nirvana is a philosophical concept in some Indian-based religions. In the Buddhist tradition, nirvana is the state of being free from suffering i.e. not experiencing craving, anger or other afflicting states.

21. Any of the French Antilles : ILE
The Antilles islands are divided into two main groups, the Greater Antilles and the Lesser Antilles. The Greater Antilles includes the islands of Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. The Lesser Antilles are made up of the Leeward Islands, the Windward Islands and the Leeward Antilles, and lie just north of Venezuela.

27. ___ Tzu (dog) : SHIH
The Shih Tzu is one of the oldest breeds of dog, and originated in China. Shih Tzus have long hairy coats but they don’t shed.

33. The “M” of MB : MEGA
In the world of computers, a “bit” is the basic unit of information. A bit has a value of 0 or 1. A “byte” is a small collection of bits (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text. The prefix mega- stands for 10 to the power of 6, so a megabyte (MB) one would expect to be 1,000,000 bytes. However, in the world of computing, the prefix “mega-” usually refers to 2 to the power of 20, so a megabyte is actually 1,048,576 bytes. Confusing …

35. It may be said with the wave of a hand : SHAZAM
“Shazam!” is a word that was coined in the “Captain Marvel” comics in 1940.

37. Alley ___ : OOP
French people, and circus acrobats in particular, use the phrase “allez hop!” as words of encouragement, sort of like our “let’s go!”. The phrase was anglicized to “alley oop”.

38. One of the Canterbury pilgrims : KNIGHT
Canterbury is a city in the southeast of England in the county of Kent. Canterbury is famous for its cathedral, where Thomas Becket was murdered in 1170 making it a pilgrimage destination for Christians. It was one of these pilgrimages that was the inspiration for Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales” written in the 14th century.

40. “Cat on ___ Tin Roof” : A HOT
“Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” is the play that won Tennessee Williams the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1955. The play was adapted into a famous film version in 1958, with Elizabeth Taylor and Paul Newman playing the leads.

44. Swiss watch brand : OMEGA
Omega is a manufacturer of high-end watches based in Switzerland. An Omega watch was the first portable timepiece to make it to the moon.

45. 1962 John Wayne film : (HAT)ARI
“Hatari!” is a film directed by Howard Hawks, released in 1962. The movie stars John Wayne as a big game hunter in Africa. “Hatari” translates from Swahili as “danger”.

47. F.D.R. program : TVA
The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has to be one of America’s great success stories when it comes to economic development. Created in 1933, the TVA spearheaded economic development in the Tennessee Valley at the height of the Great Depression. Central to the success was the federally-funded construction of flood-control and electricity-generation facilities.

52. Starbucks size : TALL
Starbucks is a coffee company based in Seattle, Washington. It is the largest coffeehouse company in the world and has over 19,000 stores. In the 1990s, Starbucks was opening one new store every single day! Starbucks is named after the chief mate on the Pequod in the Herman Melville book “Moby Dick”.

53. Talking doll that debuted in 1960 : C(HAT)TY CATHY
Chatty Cathy is a doll that was produced by Mattel from 1959 to 1965. Chatty Cathy could utter eleven phrases when a ring on a cord was pulled at the back of the doll. The speech was generated by a tiny phonograph record that was housed in the doll’s abdomen.

55. “___ You” (1955 Platters hit) : ONLY
The 1955 hit by the Platters is more completely called “Only You (and You Alone)”.

57. Org. for vehicle financing, once : GMAC
GMAC is short for General Motors Acceptance Corporation. General Motors has only a small stake in GMAC now, and indeed the name has been officially changed to Ally Bank. You and me, we are the biggest shareholders in GMAC/Ally today, since the US government gave the bank $12.5 billion to bail it out in 2008-2009.

60. It’s relatively easy to find a parking spot for : MINI CAR
The original mini was a fabulous car, one that I drove all over Ireland in my youth. It had a unique front-wheel-drive layout that took up very little space, allowing for a lot of room (relatively speaking) for passengers and baggage. One space-saving trick was to mount the engine transversely, so it sits rotated 90 degrees from the norm. That engine had a capacity of only 848cc. In 1961, a Mini Cooper model was introduced, a sporty version of the Mini. The Mini Cooper was a phenomenal hit, especially after repeated wins in the Monte Carlo Rally.

65. Charlotte and others : RAES
Charlotte Rae is an American actress, best known for playing the character Edna Garrett on two sitcoms from the seventies and eighties: “Diff’rent Strokes” and “The Facts of Life”. Towards the end of the series, the Edan Garrett character operated her own gourmet food shop called “Edna’s Edibles”.

66. ___ Romeo : ALFA
The “Alfa” in Alfa Romeo is actually an acronym, standing for Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili (“Lombard Automobile Factory, Public Company”), an enterprise founded in 1909. The company was taken over by Nicola Romeo in 1915, and in 1920 the company name was changed to Alfa Romeo.

70. “Solid Gold” host Marilyn : MCCOO
Marilyn McCoo is best known as the lead female singer with the 5th Dimension, a group that was very successful in the sixties and seventies. McCoo married another member of the 5th Dimension, Billy Davis, Jr. and the couple are still performing, but now as a duo.

74. Radio host John : TESH
John Tesh is a pianist and composer, as well as a radio and television presenter.

75. Speedy subatomic particle : TACHYON
A tachyon is a hypothetical subatomic particle, one that actually travels faster than the speed of light. Many physicists think that such particles cannot exist as the known laws of physics don’t permit anything to travel at faster than the speed of light.

78. Paul Anka’s “___ Beso” : ESO
“Eso Beso” is Spanish for “That Kiss”, and was the name of a hit for Canadian-born singer Paul Anka.

Canadian-born Paul Anka’s big hit was in 1957, the song titled “Diana”. He was the subject of a much-lauded documentary film in 1962 called “Lonely Boy”.

80. Series of bars, for short : UPC
UPC stands for Universal Price Code. The first UPC-marked item to get scanned in a store was on June 26, 1974 at 08:01 a.m. at Marsh’s supermarket in Troy, Ohio. It was a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum …

83. “Don’t have ___, man!” : A COW
The phrase “don’t have a cow” originated in the fifties, a variation of the older “don’t have kittens”. The concept behind the phrase is that one shouldn’t get worked up, it’s not like one is giving birth to a cow.

93. Acute uneasiness, with “the” : WILLIES
A “fit of the willies” is a spell of nervousness. The expression is probably a derivative of “the woollies”, a colloquial expression for “nervous” likely to be a reference to itchiness caused by wool garments.

99. Johannesburg area : SOWETO
Soweto is an urban area in the city of Johannesburg, South Africa. The name comes from SOuth WEstern TOwnship, a black township that was set up the days of apartheid. The famous Soweto Uprising took place in 1976, triggered by government policy forcing education to be given in Afrikaans rather than in English.

102. La estrella mas brillante : EL SOL
The brightest star in the sky is the sun (in Spanish).

108. D-Day transport: Abbr. : LST
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term “D-Day” is used by the military to designate the day on which a combat operations are to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that D just stands for “Day”. In fact, the French have a similar term, “Jour J” (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

109. Mountain lake : TARN
A tarn is a mountain lake that has been formed by glacial excavation.

111. Uppity sort : SNOB
Back in the 1780s, a “snob” was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn’t a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasised their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Common exclamation after “Well” : I’LL BE
6. Some G.I.’s : PFCS
10. Like the Beatles : FAB
13. Norah Jones or Cher : ALTO
17. Land in South America : TIERRA
19. Big employer in Moline, Ill. : DEERE
20. Bitterness : ACRIMONY
22. It’s salty : SEA AIR
23. Storied C.S.A. commander : R E LEE
24. Onetime Ethiopia colonizers : ITALIANS
25. Banned book of 1928 : LADY C(HAT)TERLEY’S LOVER
28. “___ Baby” (song from “Hair”) : ABIE
29. Group that’s got your no.? : SSA
30. Hawaiian priest : KAHUNA
31. Gender abbr. : FEM
34. Leans : TENDS
36. Bad way to run : AMOK
39. It’s madness : IRE
40. Put up with : ABIDE
42. Mag. wheels : EDS
43. Source material for Broadway’s “Seussical” : HORTON (HAT)CHES THE EGG
48. “___ dreaming?” : AM I
49. Oscar-winning role for Cotillard : PIAF
50. “Anne of Green Gables” town : AVONLEA
51. End of the line? : ETC
54. Paradoxical one : ZENO
56. Seaman’s swig : GROG
58. Like some communities : GATED
59. Time’s 1930 Man of the Year : MA(HAT)MA GANDHI
62. Slap-happy sort? : MOE
64. Razor handle? : ATRA
67. Japanese model : ALTIMA
68. Bad service result? : LET
69. Away’s partner : FAR
70. Kind of heart valve : MITRAL
72. English author Elinor : GLYN
73. Word that keeps the same meaning if you move its first letter to the end : AYE
74. 1955 Grant/Kelly thriller : TO CATC(H A T)HIEF
76. References : CITES
79. Western climax : DUEL
81. Spike : LACE
82. Smokey the Bear spot, e.g., in brief : PSA
83. With repercussions : AT A COST
85. Sorority letters : PSIS
87. Like one saying “Who, little old me?” : COY
88. World’s first certified gold record, 1942 : C(HAT)TANOOGA CHOO CHOO
92. A couple of : TWO
95. Adobe shade : OCHRE
96. Reactor safety org. : NRC
97. Judge’s issuance : STAY
98. Bolt from Jamaica : USAIN
100. Kid’s repeated rejoinder : WHY
101. Ecologists’ study : BIOMES
104. Kanga’s offspring : ROO
106. Fort Sill’s home: Abbr. : OKLA
107. Source of the line “They say miracles are past” : ALL’S WELL T(HAT) ENDS WELL
112. “Sing a Song of Watergate” comic : MORT SAHL
115. Former General Motors vehicles : SAABS
116. Toddler’s wear : ONESIE
117. Where to park a parka? : COAT TREE
118. Others: Sp. : OTROS
119. No-goodnik : ROTTER
120. Planted : SOWN
121. Announcer Hall : EDD
122. Former Mercury : LYNX
123. Up : BOOST

Down
1. “I really should be going” : IT’S LATE
2. Lazybones, maybe : LIE-ABED
3. Preambles : LEAD-INS
4. Sounded like an ass : BRAYED
5. “South Park” boy : ERIC
6. Look through some blinds, say : PEER
7. Take an ax to : FELL
8. Place to find a crawdad : CREEK
9. “Bye” : SEE YA
10. Bomb : FAILURE
11. Behave : ACT ONE’S AGE
12. Shout to a diva : BRAVA
13. “The Kite Runner” protagonist : AMIR
14. Mauna ___ : LOA
15. Spike, once : TNN
16. Verbal groans : OYS
18. Nirvana achievers : AR(HAT)S
19. Cooked (up) : DREAMT
21. Any of the French Antilles : ILE
26. Russian royal : TSARINA
27. ___ Tzu (dog) : SHIH
31. Class action? : FIELD TRIP
32. Nose out : EDGE
33. The “M” of MB : MEGA
35. It may be said with the wave of a hand : SHAZAM
37. Alley ___ : OOP
38. One of the Canterbury pilgrims : KNIGHT
40. “Cat on ___ Tin Roof” : A HOT
41. Not worthy of : BENEATH
44. Swiss watch brand : OMEGA
45. 1962 John Wayne film : (HAT)ARI
46. Main $$$ overseer : CFO
47. F.D.R. program : TVA
51. Some online reading : EMAG
52. Starbucks size : TALL
53. Talking doll that debuted in 1960 : C(HAT)TY CATHY
55. “___ You” (1955 Platters hit) : ONLY
57. Org. for vehicle financing, once : GMAC
60. It’s relatively easy to find a parking spot for : MINI CAR
61. Title : DEED
63. Spoken : ORAL
65. Charlotte and others : RAES
66. ___ Romeo : ALFA
69. Leaves : FOLIOS
70. “Solid Gold” host Marilyn : MCCOO
71. Mock response to a friend who pulls a practical joke : I(HAT)E YOU
73. Blown away : ASTONISHED
74. Radio host John : TESH
75. Speedy subatomic particle : TACHYON
77. Voice quality : TONE
78. Paul Anka’s “___ Beso” : ESO
80. Series of bars, for short : UPC
83. “Don’t have ___, man!” : A COW
84. Hut cover : T(HAT)CH
86. Lush : SOT
89. Warned someone off, in a way : GROWLED
90. This above all? : ACME
91. Loving feeling? : CARESS
92. Starts liking : TAKES TO
93. Acute uneasiness, with “the” : WILLIES
94. Watchful : ON ALERT
99. Johannesburg area : SOWETO
101. Be on high? : BLARE
102. La estrella mas brillante : EL SOL
103. Bluish-gray : SLATY
105. What the nose knows : ODOR
107. Start of a memo heading : ATTN
108. D-Day transport: Abbr. : LST
109. Mountain lake : TARN
110. Storage item … or one of six in this puzzle? : (HAT)BOX
111. Uppity sort : SNOB
112. Mike holders : MCS
113. Hugs, in a love letter : OOO
114. Unedited : RAW

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